East Coast Premiere of DEAR FRIENDS, Reginald Rose’s Obscure but Enlightening Play at Just Off Broadway

Just Off Broadway gives us an East Coast Premiere of a piece that rarely sees the light of day because of the playwright Reginald Rose’s more popular piece, Twelve Angry Men, but this piece, with some, but not much re-imagining, is as relevant and relatable today as it was 50 years ago.

For Immediate Release:

April 26, 2017

The Author of 12 Angry Men Gives Us a Story of What We Present to the Outside World and What Happens Behind Closed Doors

Baltimore, MD – Just Off Broadway presents the East Coast Premiere of Dear Friends, a drama from the Emmy award winning film and television author who gave us 12 Angry Men, Reginald Rose. Dear Friends is currently in rehearsal and runs ONE WEEKEND from April 18-21, 2017.

The Cast of Dear Friends. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Like the more popular 12 Angry Men, a teleplay for CBS Studio One in 1955, Dear Friends began as a 90-minute teleplay for CBS Playhouse aired in 1967 and, aside from a single matinee performance from theatre club at a small college on the banks of Lake Eerie, it hasn’t been seen on stage since. With the popularity of the 12 Angry Men, Dear Friends is a real-life, slice of life drama that has been hidden in the shadows for the last five decades until Jason Crawford Samios-Uy, Co-founder of Just Off Broadway, stumbled upon it while searching for a 2017 spring production. The author’s name was recognizable but the title wasn’t but by reading the first few sentences of the synopsis, it was clear this was an appropriate, near perfect piece for Just Off Broadway.

The Cast of Dear Friends. Credit: Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Four married couples have been friends for several years and one of the couples, Lois & Michael, decide to call it quits. The other couples, Charlotte & Lenny, Gigi & Vivian, and Douglas & Sal want desperately to help these two see the error of their ways and realize divorce is not what they really want and concoct an intervention, unbeknownst to Lois & Michael. As the evening wears on, problems in all of the marriages and in the friendships themselves start to bubble to the surface. Are these dear friends trying to help Lois & Michael get back together because they truly believe it’s what’s best for them or… are Lois & Michael examples of the raw truth that could shatter the seemingly blissful lives of the others and they want to stop it for their own sakes?

Since it was written and produced 50 years ago, Just Off Broadway Co-Founder and first-time Director Patrick Jay Golden and Jason Crawford Samios-Uy have re-imagined this piece, updating it and bringing it into the 21st century. Diverse and non-traditional casting help to modernize this piece and make it more relatable to today’s audiences. However, the story itself stays in tack as they are timeless issues and situations any married couple through the ages could experience which makes this piece still relevant today.

Dear Friends features Brad Angst, Tracy Dye, Joyanne Gohl, Penny Nichols, Sarah O’Hara, India Palmer, Tom Piccin, Jason Crawford Samios-Uy, and Emmanuel Vickers and is Directed by Patrick Jay Golden. This production will play ONE WEEKEND, May 18-21 at Just Off Broadway @ JELC located at Jerusalem Evangelical Lutheran Church, 4605 Baltimore, MD 21206.

You may purchase tickets online at: www.justoffbroadwaymd.wordpress.com.

Reserve tickets by email: justoffbroadwaymd@gmail.com. Please use Subject Line TICKETS and include the following in the body of the email:

  1. Full Name
  2. Number of Tickets
  3. Date of Performance
  4. Contact phone number

DEAR FRIENDS is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

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Famed Farce Noises Off to Receive Resident Company Treatment With Comically Chaotic Revival at Baltimore’s Everyman Theatre

If you’re a theatre lover, you don’t want to miss this show wherever and whenever it is playing! This hilarious farce shows the real-world problems that can and inevitably arise during any production and relatable to every actor who has tread the boards! So excited for this production!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 25, 2017

 

Theatre’s Season Wraps with Sardines, Silliness and Split-Second Timing

Baltimore, MD – Everyman Theatre’s Resident Company of actors transforms into a British company of actors during the 1970s in this hotly anticipated revival of Tony Award-Winner Michael Frayn’s side-splitting farce to end all farces, Noises Off, directed by Founding Artistic Director Vincent M. Lancisi and running from May 17 through June 18, 2017.

With this love-letter to the thrilling unpredictability of the stage, Everyman Theatre ends its 2016/17 season on a zany note, joined by eight of its Resident Company members portraying a cast of bumbling British thesps (starring in the fictitious play-within-a-play, “Nothing On”) whose backstage buffoonery threatens to steal the show. With their opening night on London’s West End just hours away, can the cast pull their act together before lost lines, love triangles and flying sardines upstage the production?

Punctuated with wall-to-wall wackiness, carefully timed/choreographed hijinks, and spiked with color-popping 1970s pizazz and sight gags galore, Noises Off considers what happens when everything thatcan go wrong, does go wrong, earning laughs-a-minute from its talented cast.

“We’ve all heard the saying that ‘dying is easy, comedy is hard,’ but working within a Resident Company provides a level of family-like comfort for the actors that paves the way for hilarity of the highest caliber to ensue,” said Lancisi. “When audiences recognize our Resident Company members shifting between the characters they play, and the characters that those characters play (in the play within the play), it only adds to the infectious mayhem – literally tripling up on the fun.”

Resident Company members Deborah Hazlett (The Roommate, Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire, An Inspector Calls) and Danny Gavigan (A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, Ghosts, Deathtrap) lead the show-within-a-show cast as Dotty Otley, the top-billed star ofNothing On and Garry Lejeune, her leading man. They are joined by fellow Resident Company members Bruce Randolph Nelson (Great Expectations, Wait Until Dark, Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire) as Nothing On co-star Frederick Fellowes, Beth Hylton (A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, Outside Mullingar) as actress Belinda Blair, and Wil Love (Death of a Salesman, Outside Mullingar, Deathtrap) as Selsdon Mowbray, a veteran actor with a weakness for the bottle. The show-within-a-show cast is rounded out by Emily Kester, making her Everyman Theatre debut as the naïve actress Brooke Ashton.

Other featured Resident Company actors in Noises Off include Carl Schurr (Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire, Blithe Spirit) as Lloyd Dallas, the director of Nothing On, with Eric Berryman(Red, Topdog/Underdog, A Raisin in the Sun) and Megan Anderson (Dot, Wait Until Dark, Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire), respectively, as stage manager Tim Allgood and assistant stage manager Poppy Norton-Taylor.

The Noises Off design team includes Resident Designer Company members Daniel Ettinger (Set Design), Jay A. Herzog (Lighting), Gary Logan (Dialects), Lewis Shaw (Fight Choreography) and Jillian Mathews (Props Master). Costume Design is provided by Eric Abele and Sound Design by Phillip Owen.

Noises Off first premiered in 1982 in London and opened in 1983 on Broadway where it received a Tony Award nomination for Best Play. Performed nearly nonstop ever since, Everyman Theatre’s production follows a recent Broadway revival produced by Roundabout Theatre Company.

Tickets for Noises Off are now on sale online (www.everymantheatre.org), by phone (410.752.2208), or at the Everyman Theatre Box Office (315 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201).

Event Listings

Pay-What-You-Can Performance
May 16, 2017 at 7:30 PM
Pay-What-You-Can (suggested minimum donation: $5) to see the final dress rehearsal of Noises Off. Tickets are sold on a first-come, first-serve basis at the Box Office beginning at 5:30pm. Tickets must be paid for in cash. Seating is general admission.

TNT: Theatre Night for Teens
May 16, 2017 at 6:00 PM
Students in grades 9-12 can enjoy dinner from Noodles & Company, an artist meet-and-greet withNoises Off prop master Jillian Matthews, and the 7:30 PM performance, followed by post-show discussion and dessert. Tickets: $10 each.

The Show Must Go On! A Stoop Storytelling Event
May 22, 2017 (Drinks/music at 6:00 PM; Performance at 7:30 PM)
Everyman and Stoop Storytelling partner to present an entertaining evening of hilarious-but-true stories about the unexpected pitfalls and pratfalls of the stage. Tickets: $20 each.

Taste of Everyman: Wacky Mix-Ups
June 1, 2017 at 6:00 PM
Mix and mingle with other theatre lovers during a pre-show social, this month featuring unique cocktail concoctions combining the most unexpected ingredients, and paired with hors d’oeuvres by The French Kitchen. Tickets: $60 each for show and event.

World of the Play
June 3, 2017 at 5:00 PM
Take part in an in-depth panel discussion on the themes and topics of the show, hosted by Marc Steiner (WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show). Tickets: $5 each (free for subscribers).

Salon Series: Women’s Voices: Trouble In Mind
June 5, 2017 (Cocktails at 6:00 PM; Performance at 7:00 PM)
A reading of Trouble In Mind by Obie Award-winning African-American playwright Alice Childress, directed by Resident Company member Dawn Ursula. Tickets: $15 each ($5 for students).

Cast Conversations
Jun 8, 2017 at 9:30 PM
Talk about the play with the members of the cast after the show. Free.

About Everyman Theatre

Everyman Theatre is a professional Equity theatre company celebrating the actor, with a Resident Company of artists from the Baltimore/DC area. Founded in 1990 by Vincent M. Lancisi, the theatre is dedicated to engaging the audience through a shared experience between actor and audience seeking connection and emotional truth in performance. Everyman is committed to presenting high quality plays that are affordable and accessible to everyone. The theatre strives to engage, inspire and transform artists, audiences and community through theatre of the highest artistic standards and is committed to embodying the promise of its name, Everyman Theatre.

Noises Off is presented by production sponsor University of Maryland, Baltimore. The 16/17 Season is generously sponsored by LifeBridge Health and Neil & Ellen Meltzer. Everyman Theatre’s Pay-What-You-Can nights are supported by Dr. E. Lee & Bea Robbins. Everyman Theatre is proud to have The Baltimore Sun Media Group and WYPR Season Media Sponsors. MSAC provides financial support and technical assistance to non-profit organizations, units of government, colleges and universities for arts activities. Funding for the Maryland State Arts Council is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Everyman Theatre is a proud member of the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Vincent M. Lancisi is the Founding Artistic Director of Everyman Theatre; Jonathan K. Waller is the Managing Director. For information about Everyman Theatre, visit www.everymantheatre.org or call 410.752.2208.

The Kennedy Center announces the Millennium Stage Schedule for May 2017

FREE daily performances on the Millennium Stage at The Kennedy Center! Check out what they have in store for May 2017!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

April 25, 2017

Free Daily Performances

featuring

John F. Kennedy Centennial Week D.C.

Partnership School programs

Tear a Root from the Earth

Farah Siraj

 

(WASHINGTON)—The Kennedy Center announced its May 2017 schedule of free daily performances on the Millennium Stage today. Included in this month is a weeklong celebration to honor the 100th anniversary of the birth of the Center’s namesake, the late President John F. Kennedy—whose 100th birthday would have been May 29, 2017.  Special, simultaneous tango performances on both Millennium Stages by Company E, (In)Security, or Jack and Nikki Do the Cold War Tango (May 26), will represent President Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev’s preoccupation with each other in the early 1960s. In addition to being remembered for his role in United States/Soviet Union relations, President Kennedy’s passion and commitment to the performing arts continues to extend to local communities, including the Washington, D.C.-area. The D.C. Partnership Schools Initiative is aligned with the approach to arts education employed by District of Columbia Public Schools— experiencing the arts, learning in the arts, and learning through the arts. Each school participates in a strategic planning process to develop their own arts education vision, goals, and action plan, selecting Kennedy Center resources that align with the articulated vision, goals, and plan. The D.C. Partnership Schools will be presenting programs from May 15–May 19.

Other calendar highlights include a concert by Farah Siraj (May 1), who has performed for numerous members of international royalty and also represents Jordan annually on United Nations World Peace Day, as well as Tear a Root from the Earth (May 5), a new musical that unites American and Afghan folk music to tell the story of multiple generations of one family in Afghanistan.

Now celebrating its 20th season, the Millennium Stage is the only place in the U.S. to offer a free performance every day of the year that is streamed live on the web. A full schedule of Millennium Stage performances for the month of May 2017 is below. Unless otherwise noted, performances will take place in the Kennedy Center Grand Foyer and no tickets are required. Performances are open to television and radio news coverage. Media crews must request access at least one full week prior to the performance date. 

Full Chronological Schedule for May 2017

DATE TIME PERFORMANCE
Mon., May 1 6 p.m. Jordanian virtuoso vocalist Farah Siraj spreads a message of peace through writing and performing original compositions. Her art is influenced by Middle Eastern music, flamenco, jazz, bossa, and pop with lyrics in Arabic, Spanish, and English.
Tue., May 2 6 p.m. The Janning Trumann Quartet focuses on the work of young German bandleader and trombonist Janning Trumann. His ensemble combines improvisation with composition to create their individual sound of contemporary jazz music.

Presented in collaboration with the Embassy of Germany as part of the EU Month of Culture.

Wed., May 3 6 p.m. The Dearborn Community Chorus performs a variety of choral music including diverse styles from popular show tunes to classical standards, while offering its members an opportunity to have fun and enjoy each other’s companionship. Founded in 1963, the 75-plus member choir has encouraged and promoted the development of a vital cultural environment within the Dearborn area in Michigan while providing entertainment for the community throughout its long history.
Thu., May 4 6 p.m. Trombonist Matthew Hartnett has performed with Lauryn Hill, Bilal, Dave Chappelle’s Juke Joint, and many more. Tonight he brings his funky Gumbo All-Stars to Washington, D.C. Hailing from Houston, Texas, with roots in Lake Charles, Louisiana, he brings a genuine, heartfelt musical perspective with genre-defying compositions and southern-rooted influences.
Fri., May 5 6 p.m. Tear a Root from the Earth is a musical based on the book by John Blair, and tells the story of three generations of a rural Afghan family who encounter the ideologies and violent actions of outsiders. Tear a Root from the Earth is a collaboration between composers Johnny Walsh and world-renowned Afghan rabab virtuoso Qais Essar, arranged by and for celebrated Americana band Gramophonic.
Sat., May 6 6 p.m. Led by singer/songwriter Mavis “Swan” Poole and the powerful, yet melodic drummer Jeremy “Bean” Clemons, Soul Understated is a talented ensemble with a sound that spans genres. Their sound is influenced by EWF, Ella Fitzgerald, Donny Hathaway, Curtis Mayfield, Sarah Vaughan, Count Basie, and even Hip Hop.

A special performance selected by Jason Moran. 

Sun., May 7 6 p.m. An award-winning and top-rated drum group from Shanghai, GuGu Drums offers a theatrical drum drama depicting historical and culturally significant drum compositions. Director Yang Xiaodong and his authentic ancient drum movements, as well as the actual ancient drums themselves, represent a powerful lineage—dating back to the times of the Emperors of Chinese dynasties—with a contemporary approach. The show features drum vignettes based on timeless Chinese proverbs, fables, and fairy tales.
Mon., May 8 6 p.m. A select group of music students from Washington, D.C.’s Duke Ellington School of the Arts perform jazz standards and original compositions created over the 2016–2017 school year under the tutelage of trumpeter, composer, and educator Terence Blanchard; Duke Ellington School Director of Jazz Davey Yarborough; and D.C. based alumni of the Center’s professional development program Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead, Elijah Jamal Balbed, Shacara Rogers, and Integriti Reeves.  This is the culminating event of an eight-month Terence Blanchard All-In Kennedy Center residency, which included a performance by Blanchard’s E-Collective jazz group; the premiere of a family theater production of Bud, Not Buddywith original music by Blanchard; and the WNO presentation of Blanchard’s opera, Champion.
Tue., May 9 6 p.m. Making Movies is an American rock ‘n’ roll band that keeps its Latin roots front and center, entrancing audiences with their interweaving of Afro-Latino rhythms and psychedelic rock and roll riffs. Armed with their ambitious and politically charged new album, I Am Another You (released on May 26), the band punches out one high-energy song after another with theatrics and improvisation littered throughout.
Wed., May 10 6 p.m. Hear a diverse program of chamber works performed by outstanding graduate and undergraduate students from the University of Maryland School of Music. Selected by faculty from more than 35 chamber ensembles, these students represent in the school’s nationally recognized chamber music program.
Thu., May 11 6 p.m. Saxophonist Dr. Doug O’Connor and pianist Dr. Eunmi Ko present exciting 21st century chamber music, composed by Dr. Baljinder Sekhon and Paul Reller of the University of South Florida, and Dr. Ingrid Stölzel of the University of Kansas. The featured music is abundant with fresh grooves and evocative new sonorities that creatively combine the two instruments.
Fri., May 12 6 p.m. NSO Prelude: Violinist Joel Fuller, flutist Julianna Nickel, hornist James Nickel, and pianist Sophia Kim Cook play works by J.S. Bach, Melanie Bonis, and Eric Ewazen.
Sat., May 13 5 p.m. The largest youth poetry competition and festival in the D.C. area, Louder Than A Bomb—DMV promotes literacy, self-confidence, and public speaking for teenaged poets. The poetry slam is about sharing, listening, and connecting with other young people from a different part of town, country, or cultural heritage. The Grand Slam Finals on the Millennium Stage will culminate the three-week festival where one team will be crowned the 2017 LTAB DMV Champions.
Sun., May 14 6 p.m. The Dorothy Cotton Jubilee Singers of Ithaca, New York is a group of community singers named in honor of current Ithaca resident Dorothy Cotton, a civil rights pioneer who served as education director for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Founded in 2010, the group is dedicated to the preservation of and education about the “Negro Spirituals.” Director Baruch Whitehead introduces the different songs with narration about their hidden meanings, history, or significance to enslaved Africans of the time.
Mon., May 15 6 p.m. The award-winning Woodrow Wilson High School Vocal Music Program, a Kennedy Center D.C. Partnership Initiative School, comes to the Millennium Stage. Join the school’s Concert Choir, Women’s Choir, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, and The Wilson Singers as they perform a varied repertoire of music under the direction of Lori Williams.
Tue., May 16 6 p.m. The Columbia Heights Educational Campus (CHEC), a Kennedy Center D.C. Partnership Initiative School, is proud to present the Lincoln Middle School Band, CHEC Orchestra, CHEC Concert Band, and the CHEC Choir in an evening at the Millennium Stage. Performances will feature a wide variety of styles within each ensemble as well as several outstanding soloists.
Wed., May 17 6 p.m. School Without Walls, a Kennedy Center D.C. Partnership Initiative School, presents a musical evening featuring their Stage Band and Concert Choir. The band will present a variety of contemporary popular music while the choir will perform standard concert music.
Thu., May 18 6 p.m. Barnard Elementary School, a D.C. Partnership Initiative School, celebrates and showcases the contributions of Africans globally and African–Americans in the United States through the arts.
Fri., May 19 6 p.m. The Reston Chapter of Links, Inc. and Washington, D.C. Chapter of Society Inc—in collaboration with D.C. School and Community Initiatives—presents a performance showcase of talented Washington, D.C. and Virginia high school scholarship winners.
Sat., May 20 6 p.m. NSO Prelude: Violinist Nurit Bar-Josef, pianist Tony Nalker, bassist Charles Nilles, and percussionist Joseph Connell play Bolling’s Suite for Violin and Jazz Piano Trio.
Sun., May 21 6 p.m. Target Family Night: Everyday Oz is a family–friendly performance and demonstration that partners individuals with disabilities and professional performers for an engaging show. Equal parts zany and poetic, Everyday Oz includes active audience participation to reveal the many ways that we are smart, compassionate, brave, and creative…every day!

Presented in collaboration with Kennedy Center Sound Health.

Mon., May 22 6 p.m. The American Youth Philharmonic Orchestras (AYPO) is a youth orchestra program that serves more than 400 students in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. AYPO’s Chamber Ensembles will play works by Mozart, Barber, Schubert, and others.

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Tue., May 23 6 p.m. The Trombonists of the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra come together to honor JFK with compositions that exemplify Courage, Freedom, Justice, Service, and Gratitude.

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Wed., May 24 6 p.m. From his #1 country hits—ranging from folk, Americana, roots, and a few trips into the American Songbook—David Ball and his music embody JFK’s values of Courage, Freedom, Justice, Service, and Gratitude. Ball’s unique brand of southern storytelling will also include information about the Operation Troop Aid organization of which he is national spokesman.

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Thu., May 25 6 p.m. VSA presents a diverse evening of musical talent featuring the VSA International Young Soloists. The VSA International Young Soloists Program recognizes outstanding young musicians with disabilities in their pursuit of a career.

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Fri., May 26 6 p.m. (IN) SECURITY is a work of dance, music, film, narrative, and history which exploits a unique physical aspect of the Kennedy Center to present the story of the Kennedy/Khrushchev relationship as told, simultaneously, from both points of view. The work uses both Millennium Stages simultaneously. On one stage, the relationship is told from the American viewpoint—the Kennedy viewpoint. On the other, it is told from the Russian viewpoint—the Khrushchev viewpoint. The story told on the North Stage will be simulcast on the Millennium Stage South video screen and vice versa. In this way, history is also held true.

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Sat., May 27

North Plaza

6 p.m. Former Chuck Berry bandmate, Daryl Davis, will honor the late, great progenitor of Rock ‘n’ Roll.  He may be gone, but his music lives on!

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Sun., May 28 6 p.m. Jazz pianist and composer George Burton will perform selections from his debut album, The Truth of What I Am > The Narcissist. For the album, Burton collaborated with Derrick Hodge to produce 10 original compositions that fuse traditional hard bop, avant-garde, post-bop, R&B, and other genres. Recognized for his inventive artistry as a pianist/composer, Burton’s sound is an experience that connects listeners in forging the frontier of improvised music. His genre-defying Quintet is revered for its haunting melodies and uninhibited groove.

This artist’s performance honors JFK and exemplifies Gratitude.

A special performance selected by Jason Moran.

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Mon., May 29 6 p.m. In honor of John F. Kennedy’s birthday, the Navy Commodores will perform. The premier jazz ensemble presents the finest in America’s truly original music. A specialty unit of the United States Navy Band in Washington, D.C., the group features 18 of the Navy’s top jazz and big band musicians. Under the leadership of Senior Chief Musician Philip M. Burlin, the Commodores combine the best of jazz and popular music. They continue to preserve the great heritage of jazz while also being an innovative force for the future.

In conjunction with the ticketed JFK Centennial Celebration taking place in the Opera House at 4 p.m.

Presented in collaboration with JFK Centennial Week.

Tue., May 30 6 p.m. Color Palette—comprised of Jay Nemeyer, Joshua Hunter, Matt Hartenau, Rogerio Naressi, and Maryjo Mattea— is an electro rock/synth pop band from Washington, D.C. Since their first release on June 1, 2015, Color Palette has garnered hundreds of press hits worldwide. Color Palette takes experiences like heartbreak and love, and together turns them into something mystical and inviting.

Part of a monthly local music series featuring D.C. musicians, created in partnership with D.C.–based podcast and website Hometown Sounds.

Wed., May 31 6 p.m. A singer and songwriter with a global perspective, Daby Touré brings a storyteller’s voice to the Millennium Stage. Born in Mauritania, Touré never fails to astound audiences with his ethereal voice, masterful guitar work, and catchy original songs. His singular vision reveals a complex, yet approachable sound—one that defies expectations and stereotypes of what it means to be an African artist today.

All performers and programs are subject to change without notice.

ABOUT THE KENNEDY CENTER MILLENNIUM STAGE

The Kennedy Center is the only U.S. institution that presents a free performance 365 days a year. Created in 1997 and underwritten by James A. Johnson and Maxine Isaacs, the Millennium Stage features a broad spectrum of performing arts each day at 6 p.m. Brought to the public by Target Stores and The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation, the Millennium Stage helps fulfill the Center’s mission of making the performing arts accessible to everyone. In the past 19 years, more than 3 million visitors have enjoyed more than 7,000 groups. Through intentionally identifying artistic partners regionally, nationally, and internationally, performances reflect the breadth and depth of culture in society, exploring styles including jazz, ballet, storytelling, popular music, Hip Hop, contemporary dance, opera, choral music, tap dance, theater, chamber music, symphonic music, puppetry, stand-up comedy, and cabaret. Of the many performers that have appeared on the Millennium Stage, approximately 25,000 have been Washington-area artists and more than 6,000 have been international performing artists representing more than 50 countries. The Millennium Stage has also hosted artists representing all 50 states, and has presented more than 15,000 artists in their Kennedy Center debuts. Since 1999, each night’s performance has been broadcast live over the internet, and more than 4,430 of these performances have been digitally archived on the Kennedy Center’s website, kennedy-center.org.

Need a Lift?

The free Kennedy Center Shuttle, the Center’s link to Metro’s Foggy Bottom/George Washington University Metro station (blue/orange/silver lines), departs every 15 minutes from 9:45 a.m. to midnight, Monday – Friday; 10 a.m. to midnight, Saturdays; noon to midnight, Sundays; and 4:00 p.m. to midnight on Federal holidays. Free parking is not available when attending free events.

FUNDING CREDITS

The Millennium Stage is brought to you by Target and The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation.

The Millennium Stage was created and underwritten by James A. Johnson and Maxine Isaacs to make the performing arts accessible to everyone in fulfillment of the Kennedy Center’s mission to its community and the nation.

Additional funding for the Millennium Stage is provided by Bernstein Family Foundation, The Isadore and Bertha Gudelsky Family Foundation, Inc., The Meredith Foundation, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A.J. Stolwijk, U.S. Department of Education, and the Millennium Stage Endowment Fund.

The Millennium Stage Endowment Fund was made possible by James A. Johnson and Maxine Isaacs, Fannie Mae Foundation, the Kimsey Endowment, Gilbert† and Jaylee† Mead, Mortgage Bankers Association of America and other anonymous gifts to secure the future of the Millennium Stage.

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by

David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.

Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

For more information on the Millennium Stage, please visit the Millennium Stage event page or Millennium Stage Facebook page.

Discover the Kennedy Center on social media:

                        

Review: A Short Reunion at Single Carrot Theatre

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Running Time: 2 hours and 30 minutes with no intermission

Baltimore is full of quirkiness… there’s no way around it. However, it’s also filled with a certain charm that earns it the Charm City nickname. Adding to all this quirkiness and charm, independent theatres have been popping up all over the place and trying new things, stepping out of the traditional theatre experience and contributing to the overall personality of the city. Some have been around for a few years, ten to be exact, and Single Carrot Theatre’s latest offering, A Short Reunion, Directed by various Single Carrot folks, of past and present, and Written by various authors is a new, creative presentation of short plays that takes the audience on a little field trip through Remington, a little corner of Baltimore, and proudly puts the city’s quirkiness and charm on display for an evening of blending the older (original) Single Carrot Theatre with the new.

The evening started out by congregating outside of Single Carrot theatre and breaking up into groups with tour guides and I had the pleasure of being in cute-as-a-button Brian Gilbert’s group and after a few brief comments giving us the ground rules of the “tour”, we were off… all the way over to Parts & Labor Restaurant, which was about 20 paces. Whew! The agony! Once there, the performances hit the ground running with 36 Questions or Emily & Sanders by Adam Szymkowicz, Directed by the current Single Carrot Theatre Ensemble. It’s a cute, relatable piece about a couple, Emily and Sanders, on a first date, trying to break through the awkwardness when they finally decide to play a “game” where they have to get through 36 questions they’ve found on the Internet. This piece is a great way to start off the evening, though, outside of a traditional theatre setting, the performances seem a bit scripted and unnatural, but the text and story are authentic and entertaining.

Paul Diem and Ben Kleymeyer in Grand Mal. Credit: Single Carrot Theatre

Next, cute Brian guides us down the street a few blocks, all the while keeping us engaged with questions and anecdotes relating to the piece or personal stories, to Church of the Guardian Angel where, after climbing a flight of narrow, old stairs, the audience is escorted into the sanctuary where we experience Grand Mal by Shawn Reddy, Directed by Brendan Ragan, dealing with a funeral and the dead man’s son or… sons? The material covers some existential topics such as time and space and, well, traveling through time and space and might be a bit predictable, but is enjoyable none the less.

Jessica Moose Garrett and Elliott Rauh in The Ninth Planet. Credit: Single Carrot Theatre

Leaving the church, we trek down to a corner spot where The Ninth Planet by Olivia Dufault, Directed by Lauren A. Saunders starts its performances right there on the sidewalk. Performed beautifully by Alix Fenhagen, Jessica Moose Garrett, and Elliott Rauh, this piece tells the tale of an exceedingly bright young woman who ventures off to find a better place and something new while, at home, she doesn’t apply herself in school and is stuck in a crazy situation with a single alcoholic dad. It takes a moment to “get” the piece, but the actors are committed and the space is very intimate, automatically immersing the audience.

Rohaizad Suaidi and Lauren Erica Jackson in Tense White People Have Dinner. Credit: Single Carrot Theatre

From there, the evening takes us to the Young Audiences offices for Tense White People Have Dinner by Jen Silverman, Directed by Dustin C.T. Morris. This funny piece takes us through a dinner party, of sorts, with two sisters who have very different relationships with their gentlemen. With eyeballs falling out and revelations being made, this piece is serious, yet funny with commendable performances, though Rohaizad Suaidi seemed rather scripted and over-animated, he still gives a committed performances to match the wonderful performances from Meghan Stanton, Matt Shea, and Lauren Erica Jackson. By the way, The Young Audiences offices is a great time to take a restroom break, should you need it!

Meg Jabaily and Nathan Fulton in Bruce/Brenda/David. Credit: Single Carrot Theatre

Bruce/Brenda/David by J. Buck Jabaily and Nathan Fulton (with Aldo Pantoja and Meg Jabaily), Directed by J. Buck Jabaily is next on the tour, with cute Brain guiding a few steps away from the Young Audiences offices to right in front of Single Carrot Theatre and this piece, based on true events, is definitely a highlight of the evening. Simple and performed impeccably by Aldo Pantoja, Nathan Fulton, and Meg Jabaily, this piece gives us insight into a hermaphroditic young person and a scrupulous, but respected Johns Hopkins doctor and events leading the sad ending of a person named Bruce, then Brenda, then David. It is a poignant, important piece that promotes all kinds of feels.

At this point, we’re back to Emily & Sanders (from 36 Questions or Emily & Sanders) to check in and see how they were doing on their first date and they’ve gotten through most of the questions and seem to make a connection. At this point, we also lose cute Brian as a guide in a very over-the top, absolutely scripted (I hope it’s intended to be) hullabaloo between Brian and Ben Kleymeyer, who could pull back the acting a bit, if authenticity is the objective, and Brian is “fired” or “quits” in a huff, leaving Ben to guide us to our next destination.

This time, we join forces with another group and are back to Church of the Guardian Angel and we are guided upstairs to a space that had a past life as a small gymnasium to experience Live Through This by Caridad Svich, Directed by Genevieve De Mahy. I’m going to admit it. Someone is going to have to explain the purpose of this piece to me. In a nutshell, it was like an art installment of various points of history with a piece of hanging art in the middle of the room that theatre-goers could participate in its creation by pouring paint onto it. A disembodied voice blares out of a single speaker on one side of the room with ambient music backing him up. Everyone is so busy reading the descriptions of the exhibits, hardly anyone pays attention to the voice or what he is saying, so, this one might want to be thought through a bit more. Aside from the distractions from the text, the piece just doesn’t make much sense to me, but it could be my fault… Maybe I should have concentrated more on the disembodied voice?

Dustin C.T. Morris and Elliott Rauh in Itch So Bad. Credit: Single Carrot Theatre

After scratching my head from Live Through This, we are walked down the street to the Miller’s Court Building where we are treated to Itch So Bad by Joshua Conkel, Directed by Ben Klemeyer. This piece is hilarious, performed bravely and confidently by committed, eventually scantily clad actors Elliott Rauh and Dustin C.T. Morris. Poking fun at promiscuity and the risks that go along with such a blithe attitude toward sex, this piece (which is set up more traditionally with seats to take a load off) is another highlight of the evening adding a rag-tag live band of “Scabies” to help the story along with familiar songs that add an extra bit of humor to the already funny piece.

Genevieve De Mahy and Alix Fenhagen in One More Time. Credit: Single Carrot Theatre

The night begins to wind down in a garage/workshop across the street from Single Carrot Theatre with One More Time by Eric Coble, Directed by Brendan Ragan and this short piece, told completely through action, with one solitary word of dialogue, is practically silent but powerful. The actresses, Genevieve De Mahy and Alix Fenhagen are brilliant and exude so much emotion without speaking, it truly is a credit to their acting chops. The story tells of a reunion of sorts where both parties seems to have different ideas of what they want out of it and these actresses portray those feelings flawlessly.

Paul Diem in The Therapist. Credit: Single Carrot Theatre

Ending the evening in the same garage/workshop The Therapist by Charles Mee, Directed by Genevieve De Mahy and, the ending of One More Time seamlessly slides into this piece. The garage door is raised and the rest of the ensemble from all the other pieces are standing there like Walkers from The Walking Dead and they rush in to envelope the audience with a speech performed enthusiastically by Paul Diem about the state of the arts and about artists in general. His charisma is spot on for this piece, even as he’s stripping down to his unmentionables! The audience is given little flags and other accouterments as Diem leads them out of the garage and down the street as if it is a march for art, ending at Single Carrot Theatre, coming around full circle.

All in all, it was an enjoyable evening and more like a leisurely stroll through Remington with the bonus of catching some theatre while out for a walk. The ensemble knows the materials and, more importantly understands the material and it all makes for a great night of Baltimore theatre.

Final thought… A Short Reunion presented by Single Carrot Theatre is a bold, innovative piece that the traditional theatre-goer might find a bit taxing, but it has a very personable feel and gives one a chance to explore the little corner of Baltimore where Single Carrot calls home – Remington. Roughly a mile walk, keep an eye on the weather and dress accordingly… you know how Maryland can get all bi-polar with its weather! Also, just as a note, if you have any disability that makes it difficult for stairs, unless Single Carrot has made arrangements for any foreseeable situation, there will be an issue in seeing a few of the performances because of stairs. You might want to give them a call ahead of time if you have any questions. Overall, the performance is quite enjoyable (and I got to experience it during a beautiful spring evening) and exudes the charm and quirkiness with which Baltimore drips. The tour is well-designed and thought out so there’s no unnecessary detours and though I may enjoyed certain performances more than others, I enjoyed all of them, as a whole. It’s called A Short Reunion but it’s also a short run so if you want a different kind of theatre-going experience; something new and quirky… and quite enjoyable… get your tickets now!

Short plays included in A Short Reunion:

36 Questions or Emily & Sanders by Adam Szymkowicz

The Ninth Planet by Olivia Dufault

Tense White People Have Dinner by Jen Silverman

Grand Mal by Shawn Reddy

Bruce/Brenda/David by J. Buck Jabaily & Nathan Fulton (with Aldo Pantoja and Meg Jabaily)

Itch So Bad by Joshua Conkel

Live Through This by Caridad Svich

One More Time by Eric Coble

The Therapist by Charles Mee

This is what I thought of Single Carrot Theatre’s production of A Short Reunion… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

A Short Reunion will play through April 30 at Single Carrot Theatre, 2600 N. Howard Street, Baltimore, MD. For tickets, call the box office at (443) 844-9253 or purchase them online.

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Everyman Theatre Blends Global Perspectives, Women’s Voices, and Truth-in-Storytelling for Transfixing, Entertaining 2017/18 Season

Everyman Theatre announces their 2017/18 Season and it’s filled with pieces by award winning authors as well as local folks, as well! Looks like an exciting season!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 21, 2017

 

Lineup Delivers Thought-Provoking Combination of Story and Character
Baltimore, MD – Following up on a successful year accentuated by record-breaking subscribership and trailblazing new work, Everyman Theatre announces the six-play lineup for its 2017/18 Season, celebrating actor-driven storytelling through a lens of global diversity and stories inspired by true-life events.

The season includes acclaimed works from four women playwrights, including the poignant, lauded Intimate Apparel, from two-time Pulitzer winner Lynn Nottage, Lauren Gunderson’s ruckus revisionist comedy, The Revolutionists, set during the Reign of Terror, only the second production of The Book of Joseph, the locally-inspired new play by Karen Hartman, and a co-production of Julia Cho’s deliciously touching drama Aubergine, in association with Olney Theatre Center.

Everyman will also stage two revivals next season, including Eugene O’Neill’s Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning masterpiece, Long Day’s Journey Into Night and, as previously announced, the gripping, Tony Award-winning drama M. Butterfly, by David Henry Hwang.

“Several overlapping themes organically emerged during the course of designing our newest season,” said Founding Artistic Director Vincent M. Lancisi. “From uplifting personal and collective legacies to unexpected truths hidden and discovered, Everyman Theatre’s 27th season gives voice to characters and experiences that are not ordinarily heard. Audiences can expect acting and storytelling of the highest caliber, along with a satisfying, stimulating mix of genres, tones and points of view. These are six amazing works designed to illuminate, startle, and surprise—come early, often, and with friends!”

“Whether it’s bold new work that inspires you, the incredible talent of our Resident Company of actors, or our mantra, ‘great stories, well told,’ Everyman’s newest season delivers on the core strengths that we—and our audiences—hold most dear,” said Managing Director Jonathan K. Waller. “Creating opportunities, experiences, and dialogues around great theatre is why we are here, and, through our mainstage, education and community engagement programs, we are delighted to provide so many ways for audiences to join along.”

Everyman Theatre 2017/18 Season:

M. Butterfly
By David Henry Hwang
Directed by Vincent M. Lancisi
September 6 – October 8, 2017
East meets west. Fact meets fiction. Illusion meets reality. When a powerful French diplomat becomes enchanted with a divine Peking opera star, little can quell the thirst of their intoxicating desire—but this diva is hiding more than her true identity. Celebrating its 30th anniversary this season, David Henry Hwang’s torrid and timeless Tony Award-winning M. Butterfly brings hide-and-seek to the stage in a gripping fable that proves the allure of fantasy and the power of obsession are a recipe for betrayal.

Intimate Apparel
By Lynn Nottage
October 18 – November 19, 2017
Wearing her heart on her sleeve while sewing intimates for her clientele, Esther is the talented African American seamstress in turn-of-the-century New York who has built a savings for herself making beautiful undergarments—while earnestly daydreaming of new beginnings, romantic possibilities, and the lingering affection she shares with a Jewish fabric merchant. But when an egregious deception cuts short heartfelt desires, can class, culture and circumstance outmatch the strength of human spirit? Inspired by a true story, Intimate Apparel is a heart-rending contemporary work in the style of an enduring classic—from the first female playwright to win two Pulitzers.

The Revolutionists
By Lauren Gunderson
December 6, 2017 – January 7, 2018
East Coast Premiere
Greetings from the French Revolution—where heads will roll. When you put former queen Marie Antoinette, assassin Charlotte Corday, playwright Olympe de Gouges, and Caribbean spy Marianne Angelle in a room together, literally ANYTHING can happen—especially big laughs! France’s fight for equality and freedom propels itself to modern times with this bold, brave and blisteringly funny new work about feminism, legacy and standing up for one’s beliefs. Who runs the world? The jury’s still out, but these girls sure as hell changed it.

Long Day’s Journey Into Night
By Eugene O’Neill
Directed by Donald Hicken
January 31 – March 4, 2018
What begins as an ordinary summer day at the Connecticut home of the Tyrone family morphs into a night filled with foggy, drink-laced demons where long-buried secrets are revealed – and once exposed cannot be ignored. A long-revered showcase for tour-de-force performances, Eugene O’Neill’s Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning masterpiece (published posthumously) lays bare what we all know to be true: the ardor of familial love cannot always protect you. Long Day’s Journey Into Night is an autobiographical insight into its late, legendary playwright – and a compassionately brutal look at one family’s struggle to fight for and love itself.

Aubergine
By Julia Cho
Directed by Vincent M. Lancisi
Produced in association with Olney Theatre Center
March 14 – April 15, 2018
Mid-Atlantic Premiere
When words fail, a home-cooked meal transcends differences in this touching story of intergenerational connectedness, forgiveness and the sweetest spice of life: love. As a Korean family struggles to relate across emotional and cultural divides, it’s the ingredients they share in common that lead to understanding. A perceptive and lyrical exploration of the act of cooking as a form of expression,Aubergine is a mouthwatering meditation on the beauty of life where hope is no mere ingredient—it’s the main course.

The Book of Joseph
By Karen Hartman – Based on the life of Joseph A. Hollander and his family
Directed by Noah Himmelstein
May 9 – June 10, 2018
East Coast Premiere
Like so many great mysteries, it all began in an attic with a dusty old suitcase… The discovery of a stash of letters stamped with Swastikas opens clues to an untold family history spanning multiple generations in The Book of Joseph—the gripping true story of resilience and truth-tracking determination spanning Baltimore and beyond. Richard Hollander’s book, Every Day Lasts a Year: A Jewish Family’s Correspondence from Poland, is brought to the stage in this mesmerizing new adaptation that restores a family’s uncharted legacy—celebrated by revelation and remembrance.

Tickets:

Subscriptions ($90-305) are now available for the 2017/18 season. Current subscribers must renew their subscriptions by June 18, 2017 in order to retain selected seats. New subscription orders will be accepted starting July 1, 2017. Single tickets go on sale August 1, 2017.

As part of Everyman’s ongoing commitment for making theatre affordable and accessible to a wide audience, new for the 2017/18 season is an expansion of the popular “Check Us Out” subscription package (available exclusively to new subscribers) which includes either Tuesday evening or firstSunday evening performances for all shows, for $100 or less.

Find more information, pricing and buy tickets online (www.everymantheatre.org), by phone(410.752.2208), or at the Everyman Theatre Box Office (315 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201).

About Everyman Theatre:

Everyman Theatre is a professional Equity theatre company celebrating the actor, with a Resident Company of artists from the Baltimore/DC area. Founded in 1990 by Vincent M. Lancisi, the theatre is dedicated to engaging the audience through a shared experience between actor and audience seeking connection and emotional truth in performance. Everyman is committed to presenting high quality plays that are affordable and accessible to everyone. The theatre strives to engage, inspire and transform artists, audiences and community through theatre of the highest artistic standards and is committed to embodying the promise of its name, Everyman Theatre.

MSAC provides financial support and technical assistance to non-profit organizations, units of government, colleges and universities for arts activities. Funding for the Maryland State Arts Council is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Everyman Theatre is a proud member of the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Vincent M. Lancisi is the Founding Artistic Director of Everyman Theatre; Jonathan K. Waller is the Managing Director. For information about Everyman Theatre, visit www.everymantheatre.org.

Baltimore Center Stage Announces 2017/18 Mainstage Season

Baltimore Center Stage recently had it’s grand re-opening and it looks like their back with GUSTO! Check out the 2017/18 Season for the Mainstage! Hope to see you out at some of the shows!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Baltimore—April 19, 2017. Baltimore Center Stage is pleased to announce its 2017/18 Mainstage Season, which includes productions that focus on faith, love, family, the state of the nation, revolution, and a to-be-announced world premiere play with music. This marks the theater’s first full season back in its newly renovated home on Calvert Street.

“Art at its best, for me, is a metaphor on the human condition, and that is what we think about as we choose our plays,” said Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah. “I’m thrilled to present our spectacular next season line up for our Mainstage series. And I’m excited to say we’ll announce our full list of programming soon, including Third Space and Mobile Unit productions. From our renovated building, which is intended to make everyone who enters feel welcome, to our diverse season of plays, we’re continuing our mission of access for all.”

 

2017/18 Season

 

The Christians

By Lucas Hnath

Directed by Hana S. Sharif

Sept. 7–Oct. 8, 2017

Does absolute tolerance require tolerance of the intolerant? Can a divided head find a way to lead? When the stakes are eternity, what happens if your pastor is wrong? These are the questions that arise in a present-day American megachurch in The Christians, a new play about the seemingly insurmountable distance that exists when people of the same religion hold different beliefs. Stunning in its theatricality, this production will feature multiple choirs from area churches. Prescient in its investigation of the commercialization of religion, this play spotlights the sensitive and challenging obstacles of all successful organizations.

 

Shakespeare in Love

Based on the screenplay by Marc Norman & Tom Stoppard

Adapted for the stage by Lee Hall

Directed by Blake Robison

Oct. 19–Nov. 26, 2017

“Shall I compare thee to a something something… mummers play?” And so begins one of Shakespeare’s most famous sonnets, and this charming story of love, inspiration, muses, and art, based on the Oscar-winning film. This smart and poignant tale offers a smattering of allusions that will delight anyone familiar with the Bard—or simply the English language. This story is as crowd-pleasing as mistaken identities, a shipwreck, and love triumphant, and is set in a time when a Londoner could still utter the words: “Shakespeare? Never heard of him.” A great play for the entire family.

 

Lookingglass Alice

Adapted by David Catlin from the works of Lewis Carroll

Directed by Jeremy B. Cohen

Nov. 30–Dec. 31, 2017

Fall down the rabbit hole with Alice and a cast of characters as wild as whimsy and wicked as royalty. If you’re curiouser about the other side, David Catlin’s adapted tale will send you into a tailspin of queens and pawns, riddles and mind games, madness and tea parties. Our holiday season offering is perfect for the entire family, and children of all ages will delight in this wonderful world. Families can come together to build a theatergoing tradition and enjoy the spectacular realm created from author Lewis Carroll’s legendary imagination. Join us down the rabbit hole.

 

Skeleton Crew

By Dominique Morisseau

Directed by Nicole A. Watson

Feb. 1-Mar. 11, 2018

Part of the Women’s Voices Theater Festival

From the playwright of Detroit ’67, Skeleton Crew (the third play in Dominique Morisseau’s acclaimed Detroit trilogy) tells the story of four workers at the last exporting auto plant in Detroit struggling to survive as their way of life disappears. Set around 2008, this play vividly portrays the modern struggle in a changing America, and reveals the real people on the factory line. This skeleton crew—the bare minimum number of staff needed to function—is made up of people who keep the vital operations of the plant running in the face of obstacles, rumors, and, eventually, the confirmation of their worst fears. Loyalties are tested and boundaries are crossed as this vibrant team of loyal and proud workers navigate an uncertain future.

 

George Orwell’s Animal Farm

Adapted by Ian Woolridge

Directed by May Adrales

Mar. 1–Apr. 1, 2018

One day on Manor Farm, shortly before his death, an old boar named Major told the other animals about his dream. United by the realization that all animals have a common enemy—man—the animals revolted against the tyranny of forced work. They fought and gained their freedom and established a system of thought, Animalism, based on the wise words of the Major. All animals are comrades. All animals are equal. But as months and years pass, the exalted words of the Major become distorted, and the citizens of Animal Farm come to see that some animals are more equal than others.

 

To Be Announced

Written and directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah

May 10–June 17, 2018

Baltimore Center Stage is finalizing details on a major new project that will be an extraordinary finale to the 2017/18 Season. Like Marley, this play by Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah is still being finalized and is not quite ready to be announced with the rest of the season.

For more information, or to purchase a 2017/18 Season Membership, please call the Box Office at 410.332.0033 or visit centerstage.org.

Baltimore Center Stage is supported by a grant from the Maryland State Arts Council (MSAC), an agency dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive. An agency of the Department of Business and Economic Development, the MSAC provides financial support and technical assistance to nonprofit organizations, units of government, colleges and universities for arts activities. Funding for the MSAC is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency, and the Baltimore County Commission on Arts and Sciences. Baltimore Center Stage’s 2017/18 Season is made possible by The Shubert Foundation and the Baltimore County Commission on Arts and Sciences.

 About Baltimore Center Stage

Baltimore Center Stage is a professional, nonprofit institution committed to entertaining, engaging and enriching audiences through bold, innovative and thought-provoking classical and contemporary theater.

Named the State Theater of Maryland in 1978, Baltimore Center Stage has steadily grown as a leader in the national regional theater scene. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE and Managing Director Michael Ross, Baltimore Center Stage is committed to creating and presenting a diverse array of world premieres and exhilarating interpretations of established works.

Baltimore Center Stage believes in access for all—creating a welcoming environment for everyone who enters its theater doors and, at the same time, striving to meet audiences where they are. In addition to its Mainstage, Off Center and Family Series productions in the historic Mount Vernon neighborhood, Baltimore Center Stage ignites conversations among a global audience through digital initiatives, which explore how technology and the arts intersect. The theater also nurtures the next generation of artists and theater-goers through the Young Playwrights Festival, Student Matinee Series and many other educational programs for students, families and professionals.

Baltimore Center Stage Announces Honorees for 31st Annual Young Playwrights Festival

It’s always a good thing to get the younger generations involved in the arts and Baltimore Center Stage is doing just that and no only for onstage performers, but for those with behind the scenes and production aspirations, as well! Congratulations to all the participants!

From Baltimore Center Stage:

Baltimore—April 17, 2017. Baltimore Center Stage is pleased to announce the honorees for the 31st Annual Young Playwrights Festival, a yearly competition that invites students in kindergarten through 12th grade in Maryland to submit original writing. The winning playwrights will be honored with workshops and in-school performances. A selection of plays will be staged at the Annual Young Playwrights Festival, which will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, May 1, at Baltimore Center Stage, 700 North Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21202.

“The Young Playwrights Festival gets students fired up about writing and builds their confidence,” said Baltimore Center Stage Education Director Michael Wiggins. “This year’s submissions run the gamut from wonderfully absurd comedy, to heartbreaking tragedy, and everything in between. We are delighted to produce performances in the honored students’ schools and to host the festival once again in our newly renovated home on Calvert Street.”

This year’s honorees include students in schools from across the state of Maryland, including Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Frederick County, Harford County, Howard County and Montgomery County.

 The Young Playwrights Festival on May 1 will include an awards ceremony and staged readings of plays by Alia Zerhouni, Zoe San Luis, Adriyona Reese, Joshua Salazar Alvarado, Zeke Hickman, Ruth Dawit, Jaya Connor, Dominick Anderson, Kate Jacob, Brian Jaegar, Eva Hauf, Seydou Tounkara, Julianna Gross and Miguel Fernandez. The event is free and open to the public; however, a $5 donation is suggested. Please call the Baltimore Center Stage Box Office at 410.332.0033 to reserve tickets.

Honorees receiving in-school readings of their work include Sophie Marano, Dean Gedansky, Antonio Erdas, Gabriela Rivera, Hannah Ezell, Rory Cahill, Patrick Karaska, Hannah Ellison, Khloe Quill and Jason Fontelieu.

The Young Playwrights Festival is made possible through the generous support of Baltimore Center Stage’s many community partners, including T. Rowe Price Foundation, Hearst Foundation, Transamerica, BGE, McCormick, The Kennedy Center VSA and Classic Catering.

 

2017 Young Playwrights Festival Honorees

Staged Honorees

The Little Kiwi by Alia Zahra Colón Zerhouni (Grade 2, Bryn Mawr School, Howard County)

It’s never easy to move to a new place, especially if you’re a Little Kiwi. With grouchy neighbors and funny new smells, nothing feels like home. But with a little courage, and a lot of love, Little Kiwi might just find a way to fit in.

In the Village by Zoe San Luis, Zeke Hickman, Adriyona Reese, and Joshua Salazar Alvarado (Grade 4, Baltimore Montessori Public Charter School, Baltimore City)

In a small, quiet village, the people fear their invading neighbors, the Raiders. In the meantime, their greedy King hatches a plan that seems certain to endanger the people. With only each other to rely on, the villagers band together to protect their homes, their families and their lives.

When Pigs Fly by Jaya Connor, Dominick Anderson, Eva Hauf, Brian Jaegar, Kate Jacob, Seydou Tounkara (Grade 6, Chevy Chase Elementary School, Montgomery County)

Four-year-old Josiah has one dream in his young life: to ride a pig. His spoiled sister also dreams of a pig, that she can turn into a pigskin coat. When she takes Josiah to a pig race, he realizes that his dream can only come true at the expense of his sister’s. Along the way, they both learn lessons from two zany competitors in the race, down-on-their-luck drifters with dreams of their own.

Broke by Ruth Dawit (Grade 7, City Neighbors Public Charter School, Baltimore City)

Carter and May feel lost and alone after the death of their father. Maureen, their mother, struggles to care for her kids or herself, numbing her pain with alcohol. Although everything seems broken, each of them dreams of feeling loved and accepted; and with courage and hope, maybe this shattered family can begin to put the pieces back together again.

Pasta Night by Miguel Fernandez (Grade 12, Centennial High School, Howard County)

After a rough day, at the end of a tough week, Noah wants to treat his young wife Emily to a special Pasta Night. But there is more lurking behind this simple meal than either of them realizes, or lets on; and as we watch their day unfold in reverse, we realize how much each moment can be filled with all the little moments that precede, and follow, it—and sometimes what is unspoken says more than words.

Maya by Julianna Gross (Grade 10, Sherwood High School, Montgomery County)

Jimmy dreads coming to class, where every day he gets bullied by Biff and Billy. Only Maya, his bold and mischievous classmate, comforts Jimmy, telling tales of her adventures and encouraging him with her poetry. With her help, Jimmy might just stand up to the bullies and be as brave as Maya.

In-School Honorees

Digital Escape by Dean Gedansky (Grade 5, Roland Park Elementary Middle School, Baltimore County)

In a futuristic world where virtual realities have merged with real life, Max lives immersed in technology. It all seems more fun than ever, until Max’s friends start to go missing. Will he discover where they’ve gone before it’s too late?

The Bad Llamas by Sophie Marano (Grade 5, St. Paul’s School for Girls, Baltimore City)

At the Bad Llama School, everyone is excited about the 50-millionth-anniversary party of Headmaster Chris. Everyone, that is, but Bob the Llama, who’s waited millions of years to be headmaster. With the help of his llama friend Larry, Bob plots to expose the Headmaster and finally assume his rightful place as head of school.

The Coolest Glasses by Antonio Erdas (Grade 5, Roland Park Elementary Middle School, Baltimore County)

Mr. Avocado dreams of being cooler and cooler. So when the newest, coolest sunglasses are advertised in the paper at army headquarters, he plots to steal them. But just when he thinks his plan will work, Mr. Avocado gets a bigsurprise.

Did You Hear? by Patrick Karaska (Grade 7, City Neighbors Public Charter School, Baltimore City)

Trevor Wolf is having a bad day, and he’s not sure why. After all, Trevor hates all the evil in the world, and tries to live a kindly life: greeting his neighborhood barista, helping a lost elderly woman, and comforting his sad bank teller. So why don’t things seem to be going right for Trevor? It only gets worse when he finds out that there’s a man on the run for murder….

Half-Animals: Animal Spirit by Rory Cahill (Grade 7, The Auburn School, Baltimore County)

In a parallel universe, on a planet very similar to our own, children will, on rare occasions, fuse with their animal soulmates to become half-human, half-animal. But the tenuous balance of peace and harmony is threatened by the power-hungry General Ursus, who is jealous of the ability to morph from human to animal and back again. Seven extraordinary children from all over the world band together to save nature and civilization from the General’s hateful regime.

Back to Reality by Gabriela Rivera (Grade 7, Sisters Academy, Baltimore County)

It’s the year 3094, and President Carl has brainwashed all of the citizens of Lavania to forget what freedom and equality are. Maya and her friends—sick of only being allowed to work as babysitters and cleaners because they are girls—do a bit of snooping as they clean President Carl’s office. When they stumble upon artifacts from the past, they team up with other determined allies to bring the country back to reality.

The Real Housewives of Colonial America by Hannah Ezell (Grade 8, Harford Day School, Harford County)

In a comic fusion of reality television and colonial America, Martha—”the only relatively normal person here”—does all she can to provide for her family in the challenging conditions of the American colonies. It is hard enough to put food on the table as a single parent while her husband is off fighting the British; Martha also has to contend with rich, devious housewives hungry for power and deliriously shallow.

Present in Absentia by Hannah Ellison (Grade 9, The SEED School of Maryland, Baltimore City)

In the 50 years since they said “I do,” James and Ethel have built a life together filled with love and contentment. In this haunting and poetic story of the inevitable grief we all face, we see that even in their absence, our loved ones never completely leave us.

The Devil in the Library by Khloe Quill (Grade 12, Governor Thomas Johnson High School, Frederick County)

A small town in the 1940s American South has a big secret. Young Charlotte the librarian finds her suspicions growing when an apartment complex in an African-American neighborhood burns to the ground. Race, power, and violence converge with small-town relationships and politics as the secrets hidden within the library’s walls come to light.

Worker B by Jason Fontelieu (Grade 12, Dulaney High School, Baltimore County)

Brianna works hard as the assistant to a high profile and highly demanding, but highly secretive, boss. While Brianna keeps busy day and night, she’s hiding her dreams of being a singer and trying to navigate her secret crush on a close friend. All of these secrets finally to come to a head, with a rousing song and dance number sure to get everybody up and grooving.

About Baltimore Center Stage

Baltimore Center Stage is a professional, nonprofit institution committed to entertaining, engaging and enriching audiences through bold, innovative and thought-provoking classical and contemporary theater.

Named the State Theater of Maryland in 1978, Baltimore Center Stage has steadily grown as a leader in the national regional theater scene. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE and Managing Director Michael Ross, Baltimore Center Stage is committed to creating and presenting a diverse array of world premieres and exhilarating interpretations of established works.

Baltimore Center Stage believes in access for all—creating a welcoming environment for everyone who enters its theater doors and, at the same time, striving to meet audiences where they are. In addition to its Mainstage, Off Center and Family Series productions in the historic Mount Vernon neighborhood, Baltimore Center Stage ignites conversations among a global audience through digital initiatives, which explore how technology and the arts intersect. The theater also nurtures the next generation of artists and theater-goers through the Young Playwrights Festival, Student Matinee Series and many other educational programs for students, families and professionals.