Review: Love is a Blue Tick Hound by Rapid Lemon Productions at Baltimore Theatre Project

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

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Running Time: Approx. 2 hours one 10-minute intermission

There comes a time when we all question our lives. Some do it once in awhile, some do it when things are going crazy, and some do it daily… well, most of us do it daily, and Rapid Lemon Productions‘ latest offering, Love is a Blue Tick Hound by Audrey Cefaly, Directed by Donna Ibale, Lee Conderacci, Betse Lyons, and Lauren Erica Jackson, and Set Design by Reese Siedlecki tries to answer some of those questions through four two-person shorts exposing the lives of folks from different walks of life with very different questions and problems.

In a nutshell, Love is a Blue Tick Hound is a delving introspective on relationships and ask the serious questions of life. The entire production is made up of four short two-person plays that ask life’s questions such as “are we happy or are we settling?” or “am I afraid to be alone or am I okay with that?” with a blend of poignancy and comedy that gives the audience emotional peaks and valleys that make for good theatre.

Set Design by Reese Siedlecki is semi-minimal but quite appropriate to make it easy to present four different stories. Set pieces are brought on and off stage to set the scenes and this design does its job superbly. With the use of lawn chairs, a cafe table, willow weeds, and a living room set transports the audience into the scenes easily. Transitions are a bit lengthy and clunky, but not enough to deter the flow of the piece and the cast is well-rehearsed and precise in the changes.

Light and Sound Design by Allan Sean Weeks and Max Garner, respectively, add great value to this production while Weeks sets the scene and times of day brilliantly with subtle light changes and accents while Garner produces a flawless sound design that puts the audience smack dab in the scene with a well thought-out design that doesn’t hinder, but helps the setting and adds that extra authenticity. Also, I found myself Shazam-ing the transition tunes that were used because, well, they were not only fitting but pretty awesome tunes!

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Lauren Erica Jackson as Euba and Carolyn Koch as Fin. Credit: Rapid Lemon Productions

Moving on to the shorts themselves, we are first presented with Fin and Euba, Directed by Donna Ibale, featuring Carolyn Koch as Fin and Lauren Erica Jackson as Euba. This short concerns best friends Fin and Euba (of course) as they complain about their current situation and dream about changing it but don’t do much to do so, as if they are settling for what they go or are afraid to move forward. Director Donna Ibale has a great comprehension of this text and presents the piece in an authentic, down-home way that works nicely. Koch understands her character and portrays her fittingly as someone who wants so much more but can’t seem to figure out how to get it while Jackson, as Euba, portrays her character beautifully as someone who doesn’t dare to want more. Both actresses have a good chemistry and work well off each other to present a deep connection and dependency upon each other.

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Beste Lyons as Lina and Justin Johnson as Roberto. Credit: Rapid Lemon Productions

Second we are presented with Clean, Directed by Lee Conderacci, featuring Betse Lyons as Lina and Justin Johnson as Roberto. In this piece, food service two co-workers discuss relationships and wants before opening and make certain discoveries about each other that were right in front of them the entire time. Director Lee Conderacci’s casting is spot on and she presents this piece in a minimally, but effectively. Lyons embodies her character and connects with the audience making you empathize with her character’s turmoil and her confidence and onstage presence makes one take notice. Johnson gives a superb performance as the immigrant dish-washer with a secret yearning and common sense way of looking at things. His performance is spot-on making him and this piece a highlight of this production.

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Donna Ibale as Kendra and Aladrian C. Wetzel as Betty. Credit: Rapid Lemon Productions

Next is The Gulf, Directed by Betse Lyons, featuring Donna Ibale as Kendra and Aladrian C. Wetzel as Betty. This short begins with what simply looks like two people on a fishing excursion in a deep southern watering hole. However, we discover Betty, played flawlessly by Wetzel, is trying to better herself with plans of schooling and moving out of wherever they currently are and Kendra, played by an able and intense Ibale, is content to stay right where she is. Director Betse Lyons seems to have a tight grasp on this material and presents it simply and concisely with her choice of setting and casting. Wetzel, gives a glimmer of grace and elegance just under the surface of her character and it works beautifully for the scene. The despair and want this actress exudes makes one want to just take her, hug her, and tell her everything’s going to be okay. Ibale, too, portrays her rough around the edges character impeccably with a smidgen of vulnerability that she tries to hide but can’t help but let show every now and then. This piece and its actresses are certainly standouts in this production with spot on performances.

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Mike Smith as Bob and Lee Conderacci as Maggie. Credit: Rapid Lemon Productions

Finally, the production rounds out with Stuck, Directed by Lauren Erica Jackson, featuring Mike Smith as Rob and Lee Conderacci as Maggie. This short deals with a second date between two people who might not know exactly what they’re looking for and trying very hard to impress others. Director Lauren Erica Jackson gives a good showing in her presentation and her understanding of the material is evident. Conderacci gets the fundamentals of her character, a strong woman who has a definite individuality but still wants to “fit in,” and she portrays this nicely but her delivery gets a little scripted at times, but her energy and confident stage presence makes for a lovely performance. Her partner, Mike Smith is the stronger of the duet and is, hands down, another standout in this production. His portrayal of his character, a nervous young man going into a second date and just wants to make a good impression, is on point and natural. He has a strong stage presence with a good comedic timing making for a performance that is a joy to watch.

Final thought… Love is a Blue Tick Hound from Rapid Lemon Production is a perfect fit for Women’s Voice Theatre Festival and the tries to answer some of life’s questions through a series of four short plays directed by a different director (all of whom are women and double as actors in one of the other plays) and allows for various visions of a main theme and each play is cast nicely with actors who work well together. Presenting this piece in a minimalist fashion is a wise choice as is forces concentration on the text and performances making the scenes uncluttered and more meaningful. Overall, this production is well through-out and well-presented and is worth checking out if your wandering around looking for good live theatre in the Baltimore-Washington corridor.

This is what I thought of Rapid Lemon Productions’ production of Love is a Blue Tick Hound… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Love is a Blue Tick Hound will play through January 21 at Baltimore Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston Street, Baltimore, MD and February 9-17 at Logan Fringe Art Space: Trinidad Theatre, 1358 Florida Avenue, NE Washington, DC. For tickets, you can purchase them online.

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Review: First Date at Spotlighters Theatre

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy


Running Time: Approx. 1 hour and 40 minutes with no intermission

Most of us have been there. A well-meaning friend or family member wants to set us up with someone who will be “perfect” for us. So, we give in (usually after relentless nudging) and find ourselves in a coffee shop or restaurant, waiting anxiously to meet our possible future lifelong mate. Sometimes it works out, sometimes it’s a total disaster, but every time, we learn something about ourselves and that can be a good thing or a bad thing. In Spotlighters Theatre‘s latest offering, First Date with a Book by Austin Winsberg and Music and Lyrics by Alan Zachary and Michael Weine, Directed by Fuzz Roark, with Music Direction by Michael W. Tan, and Choreography by Emily Frank, gives us a glimpse, from a safe distance, into one of these first dates and all the feelings, anxieties, and emotions that go into the whole messy affair.

In a nutshell, First Date tells the story of, well, a first date between Aaron and Casey, who have been set up by Aaron’s best friend and Casey’s sister. Aaron has no experience with blind dates and Casey is what one would call a serial dater, having a lot of experiences, with first dates, anyway. Throughout the show, we are given a glimpse into the thoughts that go through Aaron and Casey’s heads as these thoughts materialize in front of us in the form of friends, family, ex-girlfriends, etc. We are shown the insecurities, anxieties, and fears of these two young people as they discover themselves, in the process.


The Company of First Date. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

Alan Zemla’s Set Design is clever for this space, that he knows so well. He has managed to create a cozy setting using the entire theatre, making the audience feel as though they are sitting in the same small restaurant where the action is unfolding. The use of easy to move set pieces and detailed set decorations make for an authentic, immersive design that works quite well for this piece.

Choreography by Emily Frank is high-energy and fun and the ensemble seems to be having a blast performing it. She seems to know her cast well, and has created moves that her cast can perform effortlessly. With it’s contemporary style, it works well with Michael W. Tan’s focused, and well-rehearsed Music Direction. Together, Frank’s Choreography and Tan’s Music Direction add great value to this production and make for a delightful evening of theatre.


Matt Wetzel and Adam Abruzzo. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

Fuzz Roark takes the helm of this production and his vision for this modern piece is clear in his Direction. This may be billed as a one act, but pacing is a bit dragging and this piece can easily be broken up into two acts, if just to let the audience run to the restroom or stretch our legs a bit. Not even a decade old, it can be tricky to make a piece like this look authentic, but Roark does just that. With so many modern day references such as cell phones, Facebook, dating apps, and the like, dialogue could be very scripted, but with Roark’s splendid casting, he has managed to guide this ensemble to portraying an impressive realism. The transitions are smooth and the piece flows nicely (aside from the minor pacing issue) making for a charming and enjoyable production.


Reed DeLisle as Aaron and Lindsay Litka as Casey. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

First Date has quite a few characters with a small ensemble taking on various roles and this strong ensemble takes on the task with gusto and dedication. Aside from the actors portraying the main characters, Aaron and Casey, the other five actors impressively take on all of the other characters in this piece and their hard work pays off.

Matt Wetzel and Marela Kay Minosa take on the supporting roles of Man 2 and Woman 2, two other patrons in the restaurant, as well as other important characters such as Allison, Aaron’s chilly ex-girlfriend, and Reggie, Casey’s flamboyant best friend who leaves messages on her voicemail throughout the evening. According to Roark, Minosa is making her stage debut and she gives a very good first showing. She is committed to her roles and seems to understand how they move the story along, especially the role of Allison. Though a bit subdued in her performance, she gives the character an icy and snooty overtone that is required of this character and should be applauded for her first time treading the boards.


Lindsay Litka and Reed DeLisle. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

It’s clear to see that Wetzel is giging 100% to all his characters and he shines with his praise-worthy performance as Aaron’s Future Son as he easily raps his way through the number “The Girl for You.” He also gives a very strong, humorous performance as a British Rocker, with a spot on British accent and good comedic timing in another featured number “That’s Why You Love Me.” His energy is consistent and it’s easy to see he’s enjoying performing his roles but in such an intimate space as Spotlighters, it may be a bit too much at times. He’s very expressive and, on a larger stage, it works perfectly, but when the audience is inches away, it comes off as unnatural. For instance, though some may find his portrayal as Reggie, the over-the-top friend of Casey amusing, I find it to be stereotypical and a bit mocking, though the audience seems to get a kick out of it. However, that being said, he has a good comprehension of his characters’ roles in this story and has has a good command of the stage making for a strong, entertaining performance.


(l-r) Marela Kay Minosa, Reed DeLisle, and Adam Abruzzo. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

Adam Abruzzo and Alyssa Bell take on the role of Man 1 and Woman 1, but also take on other, important roles such as Gabe and Lauren, the best friend of Aaron and sister of Casey, the architects of this first date. Both of these actors are able and make all of the characters they portray individuals. Abruzzo, as Gabe, is comfortable playing this aggressive, in-your-face character, making him quite the lovable asshole, who really just wants what’s best for his best bud. He also carries his own, vocally, along side Wetzel in his featured number, “That’s Why You Love Me,” as well as his part in the rap (again, along with Wetzel) in “The Girl for You.”

Bell is cast well in her roles, especially as Lauren, Casey’s over-bearing sister and Aaron’s Mother. Her performance is authentic and varied, giving each character their own space and, vocally, she shines with a sweet tone as in number such as the emotional “The Things I Never Said.” Also, she’s hilarious portraying Aaron’s very Jewish grandmother with a good grasp on comedic timing and character.


(l-r) Adam Abruzzo, Alyssa Bell, Jim Gross, and Marela Kay Minosa. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

Jim Gross, as Waiter, the love-lorn observer, who has seen more than his fair share of first dates, gives a commendable showing. With a big presence and command of the stage, he certainly makes one stand up and take notice, but, like Wetzel, seems to be a bit too big for Spotlighters intimate setting. He knows his character and is dedicated to his performance, but it seems a bit scripted, but probably would not be on a larger stage. In his featured number, “I’d Order Love,” his booming voice easily fills the theatre and he completely understands the humor of this number and performs it nicely.


Reed DeLisle and Lindsay Litka. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

Reed DeLisle as Aaron and Lindsey Litka as Casey are the definite highlights of his production. Both of these actors have an uncanny chemistry and a completely natural delivery of dialogue that makes one forget these two are reading from a script. They are comfortable with their characters and with each other making for impeccable performances. They both have a strong presence and easily command the stage. Both are superb actors but, vocally, Litka is the stronger singe. That’s not to say DeLisle can’t hold his own, because he certainly can, as he exhibits in the poignant “The Things I Never Said.” Litka is an absolute powerhouse with every note she sings and her flawless performance of “Safer” will downright give you chills.


Lindsay Litka as Casey. Photo: Spotlighters Theatre / Shaelyn Jae Photography

Final thought… First Date at Spotlighters Theatre is a fun, thoughtful piece that you do not want to miss this season. The story is deep and poignant with an important message of not only self-discovery but discovery of the people who surround you and the interactions involved in first meetings. With high energy choreography, and a great cast with impeccable chemistry and two leads who have a natural delivery and ability to portray these insecure characters, you’ll be able to relate, if not about first dates, about how anxieties and self-doubt occasionally creep into our everyday lives. It’s also a story of how we can overcome those doubts to find our happiness, when we really need it. Get your tickets now!

This is what I thought of Spotlighters Theatre’s production of First Date… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

First Date will play through January 21 at Spotlighters Theatre, 817 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD. For tickets, call the box office at 410-752-1225 or purchase them online.

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Review: Madagascar, A Musical Adventure at Red Branch Theatre Company

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy



Running Time: Approx. 80 minutes with one 15-minute intermission

Do you like to move it, move it? Well, if you do, you’re probably familiar with the 2005 Dreamworks film Madagascar. If you’re not familiar with it and it’s sequels, it’s a cute computer-animated feature about four unlikely animal friends, a lion, a zebra, a giraffe, and a hippo, from the Central Park Zoo who find themselves on the island of Madagascar, realizing what it is to be in the wild. Red Branch Theatre Company’s latest offering, Madagascar, A Musical Adventure, with a Book by Kevin Del Aguila and Music and Lyrics by George Noriega and Jose Someillan, is the stage version of this popular film, Directed by Jenny Male, with Music Direction by Dustin Merril, and Choreography by Angeleaza Anderson, Sarah Luckadoo, and Jenny Male, is fun, energetic production perfect for this time of year when you need a break from the crazy mid-Atlantic weather and the hustle and bustle of the holidays.

Set Design by Jacob Cordell is minimal but appropriate and sets the scenes cleverly. Using set pieces, it’s easy to determine where each scene is placed and Cordell decorates the set festively that works quite will with this piece.

A highlight of this production is Choreography by Angeleaza Anderson, Sarah Luckadoo, and Jenny Male. It’s contemporary, high energy, tight, and the ensemble performs it well, adding great value to the production as a whole and keeps the attention of the targeted, younger audience members.


The company of Madagascar, A Musical Adventure. Photo: Bruce F Press Photography

Costume Design by Jackie Rebok is well thought-out, flashy, and fanciful, as it should be. With the risk of doing too much for a character when it comes to people playing animals, Rebok’s design is intelligent in that it doesn’t inhibit the actors performances but gives the audience just enough to know which animal is being portrayed. Simple, but spot on, each costume is quite appropriate and adds great value to this production. On a personal note, I think the platform boots for Melman the Giraffe are everything and a clever touch to the character.

Music Diretion by Dustin Merrill is focused and commendable and, even though the production uses recorded music (I’m assuming, since there wasn’t a pit orchestra listed in the program), his cast his well-rehearsed and committed. The score is very pop-inspired and quite catchy. The tunes are hummable and the ensemble has a good grasp of the music making for a delightful production.

Jenny Male takes the helm of this production of Madagascar, A Musical Adventure and her vision and staging of this piece is superb. She doesn’t treat this material simply as a “kids show” but as a quality production. It’s a fluffy show that’s meant to be more fun than anything, but it does have a message of belonging of which Male has a strong comprehension and her vision is clear. Her casting is spot on and her staging keeps the piece moving along nicely with smooth transitions and a peppy pace.

Speaking on the performances of this piece, it’s worth noting that every single ensemble member is 100% committed and gives dedicated, strong performances. They all work well together and take the piece seriously enough to get the message across but also have fun with the material making for an engaging evening of theatre.


The company of Madagascar, A Musical Adventure. Photo: Bruce F Press Photography

To begin, Rick Westerkamp takes on the role of the over-the-top, zany King Julien and Megan Henderson takes on the character of the business-like assistant, Maurice. Overall, these two give confident performances and are comfortable in their roles, but Westerkamp takes the over-the-top a little too far and it actually hinders his performance. It’s as if he’s trying too hard for the laugh and the portrayal falls a bit flat. Vocally, he’s not the strongest and with one of the most recognizable, catchy songs in the entire production, “I Like to Move It,” one would think this number would be the most memorable. The choreography is spot on but Westerkamp seems to be just going through the motions, depending on the assumption that the audience will find it humorous.

Ben Ribler tackles the role of Alex the Lion, the star of the Central Park Zoo and a carefree, kept creature that takes advantages of all the privileges that entails. Ribler’s character work is admirable and, vocally, he makes a very good showing but it is a subdued performance, lacking energy at times, and he seems to be so soft spoken, it was difficult to make out his dialogue through much of the performance. However, aside from a few minor issues, he has a good presence, understands his character, and seems to be enjoying the role which transfers to the beguiled audience.


Bryan Thompson as Marty. Photo: Bruce F Press Photography

Performing the role of Marty the Zebra is Bryan Thompson and he has a great grasp of this character and his need for freedom. Thompson’s delivery is commendable and his dedication is apparent for this role. Vocally, he may not be as strong as others in the ensemble, but he holds his own nicely and has great chemistry with his cast mates. Overall, it’s a notable performance and his enjoyment of playing this role shines through.

Though supporting characters, The Penguins are probably some of the most popular characters in this piece and Liliana Evans as Skipper, Angeleaza Anderson as Private, Sarah Luckadoo Rico, and Molly Mayne as Kowalski give a hilarious showing as these determined arctic fowls. They have a brilliant chemistry and work well together. Each actor portrays the individuality of each character and give the Penguins a near perfect balance of hard-nosed, military purpose and compassion for their fellow animals. Kudos to Evans, Anderson, Luckadoo, and Mayne on their wonderful performances.

Danny Bertaux is a highlight in this production as Melman the Giraffe. Melman is such a quirky character, but Bertaux pulls off a stellar performance. He embodies this character who suffers from severe hypochondria and endears himself to the audience. He works quite well with and off of his cast mates and adds a certain charm to this character. It’s worth mentioning, also, that he keeps up with the intense choreography in exceedingly high platform boots (that I absolutely adore) without missing a step. Overall, a praise-worthy performance.

In this particular production, Taylor Washington as Gloria the Hippo as the standout. This lady has a voice on her that soars throughout the theatre and makes one take notice. She’s committed to her role and adds a maternal aspect that is required of Gloria. Her chemistry with her “boys” is spot on and she takes the material seriously enough to tell the story but also has fun with the role that balances out to be a superb performancce.

Final thought… Madagascar is a cute, fun, and energetic staged version of the popular 2005 film and it transfers nicely to the stage. The music is pop-inspired and damned catchy, that you may find yourself humming on your way out of the theatre. The performances are committed and the ensemble is strong. You don’t have to be familiar with the film to enjoy this family-friendly, fluffy, and thoroughly entertaining piece of theatre.

This is what I thought of Red Branch Theatre Company’s production of Madagascar… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Madagascar, A Musical Adventure played December 8-23 at Red Branch Theatre Company, 9130-I Red Branch Road, Columbia, MD.

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PRESS RELEASE: Baltimore Center Stage to Present the World Premiere of SOUL The Stax Musical May 3 – June 10, 2018

For Release: December 20, 2017

Baltimore Center Stage
Baltimore Center Stage to Present the World Premiere of SOUL The Stax Musical
May 3 – June 10, 2018

Baltimore Center Stage has announced the final play of the 2017/18 season. SOUL The Stax Musical is a world premiere which tells the story of Memphis, Tennessee based Stax Records, its impact on the American cultural landscape, and the launch of iconic artists who created the foundation of what we know today as soul and rhythm & blues music. Directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah and produced in association with Stuart Benjamin and Concord Music, SOUL The Stax Musical will feature the music of such legendary acts as Otis Redding, The Staple Singers, Isaac Hayes and others. SOUL The Stax Musical celebrates how music played a role in bringing Americans together during the early years of the Civil Rights Movement, and continues to bring generations together, from those who remember the early days of R&B, to those who have discovered the phenomenal impact of Stax Records and its artists through recent interpretations of their iconic catalog. A full cast and creative team announcement will follow.

What: SOUL The Stax Musical
Book by Matthew Benjamin
Directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah Produced in association with Stuart Benjamin and Concord Music
When: Performances Begin May 3, 2018
Where: Baltimore Center Stage – 700 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, MD 21202

SOUL Musical

About Baltimore Center Stage
Baltimore Center Stage is a professional, nonprofit institution committed to entertaining, engaging and enriching audiences through bold, innovative and thought-provoking classical and contemporary theater. Named the State Theater of Maryland in 1978, Baltimore Center Stage has steadily grown as a leader in the national regional theater scene. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE and Managing Director Michael Ross, Baltimore Center Stage is committed to creating and presenting a diverse array of world premieres and exhilarating interpretations of established works. In 2017, the theater completed a $28 million building renovation that created more opportunities for art making and community building, with new public spaces to gather before and after shows and state-of-the-art performance spaces with the best in theater design and technology.

Baltimore Center Stage believes in access for all—creating a welcoming environment for everyone who enters its theater doors and, at the same time, striving to meet audiences where they are. In addition to its Mainstage, Off Center and Family Series productions in the historic Mount Vernon neighborhood, Baltimore Center Stage ignites conversations among a global audience through digital initiatives, which explore how technology and the arts intersect. The theater also nurtures the next generation of artists and theater-goers through the Young Playwrights Festival, Student Matinee Series and many other educational programs for students, families and professionals.

Review: A Christmas Carol at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy


Running Time: Approx. 2 hours with one intermission

Bah Humbug! It’s a phrase familiar to most who know the story of old, crotchety Ebeneezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. The story teaches many lessons including compassion, empathy, and love, especially around the holidays. So, it’s popular story and has been adapted countless times for both stage and film so, there’s always a risk that most of the theatre companies in any particular area will rush to present their own version of this staple of the holiday season. With about 15 productions going on in Baltimore at the same time, Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has joined the fray to mount their latest production of A Christmas Carol, adapted and Directed by Founding Artistic Directory Ian Gallanar, with Music Direction by Grace Srinivasan, Choreography by Nellie K. Glover, Set and Lighting Design by Daniel O’Brien, and Costume Design by Kristina Lambdin, giving a traditional look at this classic with a good old Baltimore twist.

Set and Light Design by Daniel O’Brien is simple, but impressive. A bit minimal as it is a unit set but using various set pieces to represent times and places makes for an efficient design to help move the story along and O’Brien’s attention to detail for each well-chosen piece gives the production a more authentic feel all around. His Lighting Design is also a well though-out design as it sets the mood for each scene adding a little creepiness when needed as well as bringing a particular brightness to the more lighthearted scenes.

Tiny Tim and Bob Cratchit RED team

Tiny Tim (Vivian Klepper) and Bob Cratchit (Scott Alan Small) take a stroll in the snow on Christmas Day. Photo: Jean Thompson

Kristina Lambdin’s Costume Design are nothing less than superb. Her attention to detail and craftsmanship is top notch, taking the audience back to the Victorian era with its layers and subdued, earthy colors. Each character was dressed appropriately and seemed to be as comfortable as can be in the style making for a very intelligent, authentic design.

Choreography by Nellie K. Glover is delightful and upbeat for the numbers requiring dance and merry-making. In numbers such as the Fezziwig party scene, Glover keeps the chorography engaging and in the style of the era in which the production is set, adding to the authenticity of the entire piece. The cast seems to have a blast performing the choreography making for a fun, energized performance.

Grace Srinivasan’s Music Direction is admirable as we are treated to traditional carols such as “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen,” “Coventry Carol,” and “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” that fit very well with this production. Srinivasan has this ensemble singing in harmony and has well-chosen featured vocalists. There is actually a very good balance of music in this production and Srinivasan’s work adds value to this production.

Scrooge and Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come (Elliott Kashner) reveals to Ebenezer Scrooge (Gregory Burgess) that few people will remember him fondly after his death because he has been so miserly. Photo: Jean Thompson

Founding Artistic Director Ian Gallanar wears the hats of both Director and Adapter of this production and, overall, it’s a good showing, but it does have it’s flaws. First off, setting the story in Baltimore is endearing and charming indeed, but the reminders of this in what seems every other line can get taxing and give the appearance of trying too hard. He didn’t change the time, just the place and because of that, it frankly doesn’t change much. Spouting out Baltimore street names and places is more like filler rather than important to the story line making the script seem a bit trite. He may have been a little more successful by keeping the story in tact, completely. As for his Direction of the production, it’s commendable keeping this large cast in sync, but the staging is a little flat. For instance, the fateful meeting between Scrooge and the Ghost of Marley is very lackluster and moves along at a snail’s pace, as do other scenes. Most of the performances are admirable with a well-cast, dedicated ensemble, but the staging and script somewhat hinder some of the phenomenal talent onstage. Overall, pacing was okay, but transitions were a bit clunky and slowed the flow. That being said, it’s clear Gallanar has a good comprehension of the story and the message it sends as well as a good understanding of these characters. The audiences are definitely entertained, but a little more work on the text and staging would do well for this production as a whole.

Moving on to the performance aspect of this production, Scott Alan Small takes on the role of Bob Cratchit, Scrooge’s gentle and compassionate clerk and Gabriel Hoch tackles the role of the ill, but positive Tiny Tim. Small gives an admirable performance but it does fall a bit flat throughout. He has a good grasp of the character but is stiff and scripted throughout. However, he has good chemistry with this ensemble and is confident onstage. Gabriel Hoch, one of the many children in this production also gives a good showing and is a good fit for this role and understands its importance, giving a good sympathetic spin on this character. When it comes to the many children in this production, all seem to be simply going through the motions – reading their lines and moving to their marks. A little more work with the children may have benefited their performances just a tad.

Ghost of Christmas Past

The Ghost of Christmas Past (Ashly Fishell-Shaffer) enjoys Scrooge’s memories of his Maryland childhood. Photo: Jean Thompson

There are quite a few ghosts or spirits in this production and Keegan Cassady takes on the role of The Ghost of Jacob Marley and, though he portrays a very creepy ghost, the performance seems called in but this may be because of the staging. For such an important scene, I wanted more from The Ghost of Jacob Marley, not just a walking around banging chains. It looks great, and Cassady does what he’s supposed to do in being scary, but he could step up the intensity.

Ashly Fishell-Shaffer portrays The Ghost of Christmas Past, Larry Malkus takes on the Ghost of Christmas Present, and Elliot Kashner performs the silent role of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. Fischell-Shaffer gives a fantastic, whimsical portrayal of the Ghost of Christmas Past and gives the character a good balance of empathy and sternness that the character requires to help Scrooge remember better times, as well as not so happy times that shaped him into the man he is. Larry Malkus is a dominant, confident Ghost of Christmas Present and gives a strong performance as the traditionally robust and hearty character.


Fred Scrooge (Elliott Kashner) invites his uncle Ebenezer Scrooge (Gregory Burgess) to dinner and offers a gift, which Scrooge declines. Photo: Jean Thompson

Elliott Kashner does take on the shadowy role of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, but he is a highlight of this production as Fred, Scrooge’s young, hapless, and congenial nephew. Kashner gives a committed and strong performance as the counter to the curmudgeon old Scrooge and keeps up his energy throughout the production. A featured scene, a Christmas party along with his wife, Dorothy (Alana Michelle), Topper (Bart Debick), and Caroline (Kate Forton), is natural with a good chemistry between all of the actors. Forton gives a particularly humorous performance of a young girl who’s had a little too much egg nog.

Two standouts in this production are Larry Malkus as Mr. Fezziwig and Kathryne Daniels as Mrs. Fezziwig. This scene during a point in Scrooge’s past is always a high-energy, upbeat scene and Malkus and Daniels take it to the hilt. They both give strong, energetic performances with a natural flare that make these characters likable from the moment they step onstage.

Fezziwig Dance

Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig (Larry Malkus and Kathryne Daniels) kick up their heels during an office party with employees Young Scrooge (JC Payne), George Wilkens (Bart Debicki) and others (Lauren Engler and Elana Michelle) among the revelers. Photo: Jean Thompson

Gregory Burgess is superb as Ebeneezer Scrooge and has a tight grasp on this character and what he’s all about. His transition from the beginning of this story to the end is seamless but noticeable, as it should be. He has a strong presence and a great command of the stage making him an ideal Ebeneezer Scrooge. There are a few curious choices he makes portraying this character such as a screeching yelp I believe is supposed to be comical but comes off more jarring than anything and a tendency to over-act with large, sweeping gestures and exaggerated facial expressions. Regardless, Burgess portrays this popular, well-known character with a natural ease and succeeds in transitioning Scrooge from a stingy, heartless old man to a loving, compassionate being who has really learned the meaning of Christmas and the love of your fellow man.

Final thought… A Christmas Carol is a timeless tale that can be challenging to give an overall fresh look. Some adaptations are successful, some are so-so, and some are downright painful. I’d put this production at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company in the middle category of so-so. Don’t get me wrong… the production itself is quite good and the audiences seem to enjoy it immensely. Most of the performances were top-notch and dedicated, the costumes were on point, the music selections are appropriate and well-rehearsed, the Set Design is spot on, and all technical aspects of this production work nicely together. The problem lies in the script and the attempt to bring Baltimore into the equation. This story is such that it can be set anywhere, but the setting is not so important as the lesson taught and being reminded that we are in Baltimore every five minutes got downright annoying. We get it. We’re in Baltimore. It’s cute and it helps the audience make a connection, but sometimes it’s best to air on the side of moderation. As stated, overall, it is a well put-together, focused and, even though there are about fifteen other productions of A Christmas Carol happening in the area, this is a production, aside from a few minor flaws, worth checking out during the holiday season.

This is what I thought of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s production of A Christmas Carol… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

A Christmas Carol will play through December 23 at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, 7 South Calvert Street, Baltimore, MD. For tickets, call the box office at 410-244-8571 or purchase them online.

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Review: The Revolutionists at Everyman Theatre

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy


Running Time: Approx. 2 hours with one intermission


(l-r) Beth Hylton, Emily Kester, Megan Anderson, and Dawn Ursula. Photo: ClintonBPhotography

When strong women get together, change can happen, ideas can turn into action, and passions can be expressed. At a time when women voices are becoming stronger and more empowered, Everyman Theatre‘s latest offering, The Revolutionists by Lauren Gunderson, Directed by Casey Stangl, gives us an extremely humorous, but extremely poignant look at how women’s voices can make the aforementioned change whether it be in their current time or for posterity. It’s a story of how important a woman’s voice can be, even in the darkest of times.

Briefly, The Revolutionists is about a group of women, a playwright, a strong woman of color and activist, an assassin, and… a queen who discuss life and current events in Paris, France during the Reign of Terror (circa 1793) when the government is chopping off heads with the guillotine at the drop of a hat and a revolution is definitely brewing. These women, who have gathered in a study, a safe space, obviously come from different walks of life explain life and their thoughts to each other as they individually know them and they learn from and teach each other along the way, growing just a little strong and wiser just from knowing each other.


(l-r) Emily Kester, Beth Hylton, Megan Anderson, and Dawn Ursula. Photo: ClintonBPhotography

Daniel Ettinger’s Set Design is well thought-out and brings this piece together nicely. With various locations, including a large study in a home, a prison cell, and the scaffold where the dreaded guillotine lives, Ettinger has managed to smoothly mesh these locations together with a clever design using set pieces and projections that work in tandem with each other to move the story along nicely.

Light Design by Elizabeth Harper and Sound Design by C Andrew Mayer blend beautifully within the production and help the audience, both visually and audibly, discern where any particular scene is taking place. The mood is created nicely with these aspects as well, engaging the audience wholly. With a nice balance of subtle and bold lighting changes and well-chosen and executed sound effects, Harper’s Light Design and Mayer’s Sound Design add great value to this production.


(l-r) Dawn Ursula as Marianne Angelle and Beth Hylton as Marie Antoinette. Photo: ClintonBPhotography

David Burdick’s Costume Design is on point with these diverse characters. Each character has such a distinguishable personality and look, Burdick manages to bring out these differences in unique, yet appropriate costumes for each. His attention to detail is impeccable as with Marie Antoinette’s bright yellow and garnished ensemble that exudes the excess and decadence for which she is known (whether accurate or not). The authenticity of the costumes brought these characters to life and made them complete individuals which helped move the story along very nicely.

Casey Stangl takes the helm of this production and her Direction of this piece is, in a word, superb. She has a definite grasp and comprehension of this piece and it shines through in the staging and through the actors’ portrayal of these characters. Stangl’s staging is well-paced and engaging while be focused and clean. The transitions are smooth from one scene and setting to another making making for an even flow that’s easy to follow. Her casting is spot on and her overall vision of presenting strong, confident women is quite apparent.


Emily Kester as Charlotte Corday. Photo: ClintonBPhotography

Performance-wise, this piece is acted beautifully and confidently with each member of the small four-person ensemble giving fully committed performances making the roles their own. The chemistry between these actors seems effortless and they all work well with and off of each other, especially Dawn Ursula as Marianne Angelle, the scrappy activist and Beth Hylton as the bubbly Queen Marie Antoinette, who play off of each other’s performance superbly.


Megan Anderson as Olympe de Gouges. Photo: ClintonBPhotography

Emily Kester takes on the role of Charlotte Corday, a young assassin who comes to the only female playwright she knows of to write her last words before she is put to death for killing a very prominent male figure. Kester embodies this character and performs the role with high energy and gusto as required. Her comedic timing is good though it would benefit her and the production if she gave the audience a moment to laugh at the funny lines rather than speaking over the laugh, thus losing many of her lines. She plays this rough-around-the-edges character well and gives the comedy a good balance with poignancy and passion. Overall, she gives a commendable performance that’s a delight to watch.

Olympe de Gouges, the reluctant revolutionist female playwright, is played flawlessly by the incomparable Megan Anderson, an Everyman Resident Company member. She has a good grasp on this character and is authentic in her mannerisms and characterization of this high-strung and passionate character. Anderson’s delivery of the text is spot on and her comedic timing is down pat. She does well with this witty, intelligent dialogue and gives a confident, comfortable, and praiseworthy performance.


(l-r) Emily Kester as Charlotte Corday and Dawn Ursula as Marianne Angelle. Photo: ClintonBPhotography

As mentioned, Everyman Resident Company member Dawn Ursula takes on the role of Marianne Angelle, the sassy activist who is trying to bring liberty and justice to her people of the Caribbean and she plays it to the hilt. With a keen and impressive sense of deadpan comedy and its delivery, Ursula is gives a strong, authentic presentation and embodies this character wholly. She has a good comprehension of what this character is about and exudes the passions and empathy that is required in her delivery of the text and is certainly one to watch in this production.

As stated previously, Beth Hylton, another Everyman Resident Company member tackles the complex role of Marie Antoinette, Queen of France who doesn’t really get the regular folks, and she is, hands down, the standout in this production. With an Elle Woods (of Legally Blond) type personality and persona, Hylton is both hilarious and touching in this role. This character seems to be the one that grows and learns the most in this piece and it makes sense. The others are fighting against everything Marie Antoinette stands for, or seems to stand for, but, after talking and spending time with the other characters, her empathy shines through and she really seems to comprehend their plights. Hylton portrays this exquisitely, all the while keeping the comedy in tact while showing the compassionate and empathetic side to Marie. With a balance of humor and poignancy, Hylton shines as this flourishing character, giving a strong, note-worthy performance.


Beth Hylton as Marie Antoinette. Photo: ClintonBPhotography

Final thought… The Revolutionists is a fun, hysterical but thoughtful and important look at how women’s voices can change the course of events and be important in deciding upon policy. The performances are strong and confident, much like the characters these actors are portraying, and the message is clear. Though a comedy, the production is focused and well-thought out both technically and onstage. With it’s modern, comedic twist on a dark, confusing era, The Revolutionists tickles the brain with witty and intelligent humor that forces us to think while we laugh and it’s a production that is not to be missed this season. Get your tickets, now, for this brilliant, funny, and thought-provoking piece of clever theatre!

This is what I thought of Everyman Theatre’s production of The Revolutionists… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

The Revolutionists will play through January 7 at Everyman Theatre, 315 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD. For tickets, call the box office at 410-752-2208 or purchase them online.

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Review: Lookingglass Alice at Baltimore Center Stage

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy


Running Time: Approx. 90 minutes with no intermission

Curiouser and curiouser… those are the words that come to mind when I think about the traditional, albeit twisted and psychedelic tale of a little girl named Alice and her adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. It’s a dream-like story that can sometimes be convoluted and hard to follow, but there’s a certain appeal it has that has helped it survive many re-births since it’s original publishing in 1865. Whether it receives the Disney treatment in the 1951 animated feature, Alice in Wonderland, or the Tim Burton treatment in his 2010 film, Alice in Wonderland, it has never been a story I go out of my way to read or see presented on stage or film… until now. Baltimore Center Stage’s latest offering, Lookingglass Alice, an adaptation of the stories of Lewis Carroll by David Catlin, Directed by Jeremy B. Cohen, with Music Direction by Jose C. Simbulan and Choreography by Rennie Harris gives this timeless story a fresh, modern re-boot with fun music and fast-paced staging that pulls it out of the Victorian age and places it right into the hands of 21st century.

Media Gallery_1200x__Technically, this production is top-notch. Set Design by Tim Mackabee and Light and Sound Design by Rui Rita and Lindsay Jones, respectively, pull this production together in an awe-inspiring mix that tingles all the senses. Mackabee is wise to use a minimal, unit set that is quite appropriate and does not interfere with, but enhances the telling of the story, providing levels and though-out set pieces to keep the production interesting. Working in tandem with Mackabee’s design is the well thought-out and attention grabbing light show that sets the mood of each scene beautifully and gives a nightclub feel in well-placed points of the production, keeping the audience engaged and interested.

Media Gallery_1200x__10Lindsay Jones’ sound design is nothing but superb. Every effect is placed perfectly and carefully making the experience that much more enjoyable. Not only is he responsible for Sound Design but he also wears the hats of Composer of original music and Musical Arranger taking the well-chosen songs and fitting them into the piece perfectly to help move the story along and give it depth. Major kudos to Jones for his impeccable work on this piece.

Rennie Harris’ Choreography is inspiring and full of energy making this piece engaging and engrossing with a mix of hip-hop and lyrical moves fill the stage and show off the ensemble’s individual abilities. Also, working together with Harris’ fabulous choreography, Jose C. Simbulan’s Music Direction is on point as this cast is flawless in the delivery of the songs included in this piece. Both choreography and vocal performances make for a delightful and intriguing two hours of theatre.

Jeremy B. Cohen takes the helm of this production of Lookingglass Alice and his direction is spot on with focused, precise staging that gets actors on and off efficiently and transitions between the scenes, which are more like vignettes, are flawless. The pacing is near perfect with every moment used wisely. Cohen’s comprehension of this piece is quite apparent as his refreshing vision of this aged story with an updated, intelligent script is presented with a delicate balance of new and old.

Media Gallery_1200x__7Moving on to the performance aspect of this production, all of the actors in this small ensemble take on many, varied roles but it’s worth mentioning the extremely able ensemble members Jessica Bennet and Sensei Silab. Bennet and Silab are committed and it’s easy to see they give 100% to their various roles. Both of these actors have a definite grasp on the complex choreography and musical arrangements and they add great value to this production as a whole.

Garrett Turner, who takes on the roles of White rabbit, White Night, and March Hare is a delight to watch as he embodies these very different characters with ease. As the White Night, he has fantastic comedic timing and he is  comfortable in his well-placed interactions with the audience. His ability to switch on and off between characters is impressive

Media Gallery_1200x__9Christopher Ramirez takes on the roles of Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) and the White Queen, among others and his performance is commendable. He understands his characters and shines as the caring  Mr. Dodgson who gets on the level of a young girl and tries to explain the world to her in terms she might understand. He is hilarious as the White Queen, throwing shade that RuPaul himself would be proud of, but also balances out by playing the character seriously and not over the top, exuding a compassion and caring that is required of the role. Vocally, Ramirez does a bang-up job with a smooth, booming baritone voice and shines in featured numbers such as in Milo Green’s “Afraid of Everything.”

David Darrow is a highlight in this production as he tackles the roles of Cheshire Cat, Mad Hatter, and Humpty Dumpty, among others. The characters are diverse and Darrow portrays each character effortlessly. Not only does he have admirable dramatic chops, this multi-talented performer provides much of the live music in this piece with a guitar and adds great value with a clear bari-tenor voice in numbers such as Jonathan Coulton’s “I Crush Everything,” and Ruth Berthe’s “Golden.” Whether he’s effectively portraying the Cheshire Cat, slinking across the stage, or giving a frantic performance as the high-energy Mad Hatter, or a comical, nerdy take on Humpty Dumpty, Darrow is certainly one to watch in this production.

Media Gallery_1200x__6Markita Prescott takes on the titular role of Alice in this production and gives an absolutely authentic and natural performance, embodying this young girl as she navigates through Wonderland searching for a way to become a queen. Prescott has great chemistry with her fellow ensemble members and really seems to have a great comprehension of her character. She plays Alice with the innocence of a child but the sass of a girl who can take care of herself and the curiosity of a person coming of age. Vocally, Prescott is superb with a strong voice that resonates throughout the theatre in numbers like the driving Emile Sande song “Breathing Underwater” and a more subdued, delicate sound that she uses in the poignant “Golden.” Overall, Prescott gives a strong, confident performance that pulls the piece together.

Media Gallery_1200x__2The definite standout in this production, hands down, is Patrice Covington as the Red Queen. Though she gives great turns in roles such as the Dormouse and Tweedle Dee, she shines brighly and intensely as the Red Queen. She steals the show during her featured number, the high-energy, upbeat Demi Lovoto tune “Confident”and that’s exactly what she exudes in her performance. The balance of elegance and diva-ness she brings to the role is on point and makes for an authentic portrayal of a tyrannical queen. Covington’s vocal performance is powerful and seemingly effortless as she wails her number with confidence, as the song suggests, and her own flare of showmanship that is second to none. I’ll be following this actresses career and am looking forward to seeing her onstage in the future.

Final thought…Lookingglass Alice is a modern, funky, and refreshing look at a very old, familiar story. The performances of this small ensemble playing various roles are focused and engaging, breathing new life and ideas into the well-known piece. The music that has been added and the arrangements of those songs give the impression that these tunes were written for this piece because they fit so well and help progress the story line. Overall, it’s a fun show to experience and whether you’re familiar with little Alice and her adventures in Wonderland or a newbie to her journeys, you will not be disappointed with this production and it’s energy. Get your tickets now as this is not one production you want to miss this season.

This is what I thought of Baltimore Center Stage’s production of Lookingglass Alice… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Lookingglass Alice will play through December 31 at Baltimore Center Stage, 700 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, MD. For tickets, call the box office at 410.332.0033 or purchase them online.

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