Review: Noises Off at Everyman Theatre

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Running Time: 2 hours and 30 minutes with two intermissions (one 15-minute and one 10-minute)

Doors and sardines! Doors and sardines! Apparently, that’s what life is all about… right? Well, maybe not, but it’s always exciting (and a little voyeuristic) to take a peek behind the scenes to see how a show is produced. I don’t know about you, but when a film or an album tickles my fancy, I always enjoy seeing a “Making of…” that particular project and Everyman Theatre‘s latest and last offering of their 2016-17 season, Noises Off by Michael Frayn, Directed by Vincent M. Lancisi, gives us a humorous, frantic peek into what it takes to get a show off the ground and that the show must go on… no matter what.

L-R Deborah Hazlett, Megan Anderson, Carl Schurr, Beth Hylton, Bruce Nelson, and Eric Berryman. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Noises Off is a “show within a show,” meaning the show itself is about putting on a show called Nothing On and Everyman Theatre has even provided the audience with a program for Nothing On, which adds to the authenticity of the piece. The show is given to us in three acts with breaks in between each act. Act I consists of the final dress, Act II takes place backstage a few months into the tour with the play still going on in the front with problems upon problems going on in the back, including cast love triangles, real and imagined, and Act III shows a performance during the last leg of the tour when everyone has lost all give-a-fuck and have stopped being nice and have started getting real, making for some interesting choices onstage. The comedy comes from the slight changes in each Act as the character flaws come to surface off-stage causing everyone to undermine their on-stage performances with A LOT of slapstick. The contrast between the fictional characters of the play Nothing On and the fictional actors playing those characters is also a great example of comic dissonance.

It’s worth mentioning that Noises Off was made into a film in 1992 and starred heavy-hitters such as Carol Burnett, Michael Cain, John Ritter, and Christopher Reeve, among other big names of the time, and, though it was a box office flop, it has since become a favorite (for those who love theatre, anyway), and has gained a sort of cult-ish following. I’m proud to say I’m a part of that group and I LOVE this film.

BACK: Bruce Nelson and Beth Hylton. FRONT: Danny Gavigan, Deborah Hazlett, and Carl Schurr. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

That being said, the production at Everyman Theatre is definitely one to contend with. With Director Vincent M. Lancisi at the helm, Everyman has made this production their own and it is difficult to compare, which is a feat in itself. Lancisi has a complete comprehension of this piece and the farcical comedy with which it comes. He keeps the action moving and the pacing, for the most part, is spot on. Most of the casting is spot on and Lancisi was wise to use the Everyman Theatre Resident Company to fill all but one role as they were splendid in the roles. Though Act I seems a bit subdued, I was at a matinee performance, so, that may have been a factor but, overall, Lancisi does a superb job presenting the never-give-up essence of this piece and brining to the audience an example of putting on a show and what happens behind the scenes as opposed to what we, the audience, sees as the final product.

L-R Beth Hylton, Bruce Nelson, Danny Gavigan, Deborah Hazlett, Emily Kester, Eric Berryman, and Wil Love. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

I would not do any favors for this review or do the production justice if I didn’t mention the set for this production. I’ve stated in the past that Everyman Theatre has yet to disappoint when it comes to their sets and this production is no different at all. Set Design by Daniel Ettinger is exquisite and complex but absolutely appropriate for this piece. Ettinger has an amazing attention to detail and from the stylish woodwork to the knick-knacks, every set piece is befitting and seems to have been carefully chosen. As the three acts require a “flipping” of the set to represent both the front of the set as well as backstage, Set Design must be handled carefully and Ettinger is on point with is design. During the breaks between acts, the set is flipped completely and while most theatres who produce Noises Off have the luxury of a revolve on the stage, Everyman Theatre crew has to manually flip individual set pieces and they do so with great precision and speed so a major shout out and kudos to Stage Manager Cat Wallis and the stage crew of this production.

Emily Kester as Brooke Ashton and Danny Gavigan as Garry Lejeune. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Costume Design by Eric Abele is appropriate as Director Vincent M. Lancisi wisely decided to keep the play set in the 1970s and all the actors were dressed in the general styles of the day with nothing too modern, and all looked comfortable, even the poor actor playing Garry Lejeune with his plaid pants and matching coat and the actress playing the scantily clad Brook Ashton running around in her underwear for most of the show. Abele’s overall Costume Design helped the setting of the piece added value to it rather than distract from it.

Lighting and Sound Design by Jay Herzog and Phillip Owen, respectively, is impressive with an acute attention to detail that added extra authenticity to the production. The slight differences between the front of the set to the back of the stage lighting is realistic as there are certainly different levels of brightness and darkness and the difference in sound is exceptional. Being familiar with being backstage during a production, it’s uncanny how Herzog manages to bring that sound to the audience – a sort of muffled, but understandable speaking to which one must pay close attention to hear what is being said. Both Herzog and Owen are to be commended on their work for this production.

L-R Danny Gavigan as Garry LeJeune, Deborah Hazlett as Dotty Otley, and Bruce Nelson as Frederick Fellowes. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

The ensemble for this production of Noises Off is top-notch and all are dedicated, committed performers who understand the piece and the comedy/farce that goes along with it.

Though all of the performances were on point, Carl Schurr’s take on the role of Lloyd Dallas, the helpless director of the runaway train of a production, falls a little flat for me. The character has peaks and valleys of frustration, calm, anger, and resignation, but Schurr doesn’t seem to invest enough emotion to show the contrast between the feelings this character is experiencing. His frustration could be much more which would make the instant switch to calm much more comedic. I can see where he is going with the character, trying to keep the calm and being a British gentleman, of sorts, but I would still like to see the desperation of the character trying to make the show work. That being said Schurr’s comedic timing is absolutely marvelous and he has great chemistry with his cast making for an fine performance.

FRONT: Bruce Nelson as Frederick Fellowes. BACK: Emily Kester as Brooke Aston. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Bruce Randolph Nelson takes on the role of the dim-witted Frederick Fellowes who is prone to nose-bleeds and isn’t a very good actor at all. In this sense, Nelson is such a good actor, he has this character down pat and certainly makes the role his own as he hits the ground running. The spirit of show is improvisation and Nelson is a hands-down expert in this area. However, there may have been times he took it a bit far, this could just be me being stuffy, but he does such a fine job with the script, too much addition takes away from the performance. This isn’t to say Nelson doesn’t do a great job because he most certainly gives an impeccable performance that will have you belly-laughing throughout his performance.

Megan Anderson as Poppy NOrton-Taylor and Eric Berryman as Tim Allgood. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Tackling the roles of the poor over-worked Stage Manager, Tim Allgood and Assistant Stage Manager, Poppy Norton-Taylor, are Eric Berryman and Megan Anderson, respectively and these two actors completely embody these roles and make them their own. In real life, the behind the scenes folks are sometimes the most dedicated to a production and Berryman and Anderson evoke that spirit in these characters flawlessly, frantically trying to keep the show on course and doing whatever they can to help. Anderson’s portrayal of the skittish, emotional Poppy makes you feel for this character from the get and Berryman’s take on the easily flustered Tim, is funny and authentic.

Danny Gavigan takes on the young Garry Lejeune, a good enough actor with a jealous streak, who involved with the older Dotty Otley and can’t finish a sentence to save his life, unless it’s scripted. Gavigan does a bang up job in this role. His contrast between the two characters he plays (the actor and the character in the play Nothing On) is clear and concise and his physical work a could be a tad more frenetic and fluid but he does a superb job, looks comfortable in the role, and has a very good command of the stage.

L-R Megan Anderson as Poppy NOrton-Taylor, Wil Love as Selsdon Mowbray, and Deborah Hazlett as Dotty Otley. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Wil Love is hilarious as Selsdon Mowbray, the aging, heard of hearing, alcoholic actor who seems to be on his own time and script, but manages to shuffle along with the rest of the show. Love’s comedic timing is spot on and he completely embodies this character making him real and a joy to watch. Emily Kester takes on the role of Brooke Ashton, the ditsy, by-the-script bombshell blond actress, and holds her own with the Resident Company members and they seem to welcome her with open arms. Running around in her unmentionables for a majority of the show doesn’t seem to faze Kester and she gives a strong comedic performance having great chemistry with her cast mates.

Beth Hylton tackles the role of Belinda Blair, the upbeat, positive (for the most part), peacemaker of the troupe and gives a beautiful performance. She’s confident and graceful as this character but also plays the comedic bits superbly, as well. Hylton’s portrayal is believable as the positive one in the group who sees the glass as half-full and is enough to get on your nerves, but also as the one who is able to keep it together when things start falling apart. She gives a committed performance that is a joy to watch.

Deborah Hazlett as Dotty Otley. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Deborah Hazlett as Dotty Otley is absolutely believable and likable in this role and her comedic timing is outstanding. She seems to start off cautious at first, kind of like a slow burn, but then she starts to let loose and by the second act, she lets it go, especially with her quiet interactions with Gavigan who, as Garry, is the love interest to her character, and the relationship is rocky. She may lose her accent here and there, but for the most part, she has it down. Her facial expressions and mannerisms as this character are excellent and make for a very successful performance.

Final thought… Noises Off at Everyman Theatre is a madcap farce that will tickle the most stubborn of funny bones. With a witty script and a dedicated cast, we are given a peek behind the curtain of putting on a production and all that goes with it, good and bad. The entire production is well put-together and the cast has a superb comprehension of the piece. Noises Off has been popular in its own right but contending with a beloved film version (in theatre community, anyway) comparison is always a challenge. However, this production knocks it out of the ballpark. The pacing is frantic, as it should be, and the comedy is spot on making this a must see this season. I couldn’t think of a better way to end out a season so… get your tickets while they last!

This is what I thought of Everyman Theatre’s production of Noises Off… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Noises Off will play through June 18 at Everyman Theatre, 315 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD. For  tickets, call the box office at 410-752-2208 or purchase them online.

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Press Release: Record-breaking advanced sales for Noises Off; Sardine spiked silliness starts May 17

Get your tickets to Everyman’s #1 pre-opening box office smash!

Everyman Theatre’s Resident Company of actors transforms into a British company of actors during the 1970s in this hotly anticipated revival of Tony Award-Winner Michael Frayn’s side-splitting farce to end all farces, Noises Off, directed by Vincent M. Lancisi. With their opening night on London’s West End just hours away, can the cast pull their act together before lost lines, love triangles and flying sardines upstage the production? A love-letter to the thrilling and unpredictable nature of the stage, Noises Off will leave you rolling in the aisles as everything that could go wrong, does go wrong.

Noises Off runs May 17-June 18. Tickets $10-64.


~~~~~~~~~~ DIG DEEPER ~~~~~~~~~~

The Show Must Go On!

Monday, May 22; Drinks & Music at 6:00 PM, Show at 7:30 PM

Co-presented with Stoop Storytelling, Baltimore theatre makers share hilarious-but-true stories of unexpected pitfalls and pratfalls of live performance.

Inside Look: Chaos in the Wings

Everyman’s own Resident Company Members Dawn Ursula, Beth Hylton, Wil Love, Bruce Randolph Nelson, and Carl Schurr share their best/worst backstage mishaps and personal theatre nightmares…

Last chance to save up to 15% on tickets to the “Mother” of all farces

Use code ROSE17 to save 10% off tickets to weekday performances, Sunday evenings, and Saturday matinees. Use code MUM17 to save 15% off tickets to Friday/Saturday evening performances and Sunday matinees.

Q&A with Noises Off Director Vincent M. Lancisi in DC Metro Theatre Arts

Learn more about the events and partnerships surrounding Noises Off in this DC Metro Theatre Arts interview with Noises Off director, and Everyman Founding Artistic Director, Vincent M. Lancisi.

~~~~~~~~~~ UP NEXT AT EVERYMAN ~~~~~~~~~~

Play a role: The Mousetrap

Saturday, June 3, 6:00 PM

An interactive play-reading event, hosted at the Baltimore County home of Everyman Board Member Corie Codine. Enjoy cocktails on the veranda along with a buffet dinner at this renovated old farmhouse, as you read a perfectly crafted whodunit by Agatha Christie.

Salon Series: Trouble in Mind

Monday, June 5, 6:00 PM

We close out our Salon Series’ season with the Alice Childress play, Trouble in Mind, directed by Dawn Ursula. Both a witty love letter to the theatre and a call for equality, Trouble in Mind reminds us that we all have a part to play in the fight for civil rights.

Codes ROSE17 and MUM17 expire Sunday, May 14 at 11:59 PM. Offers are valid on tickets to all performanes of Noises Off. Offer is valid on adult tickets only and cannot be combined with other offers and codes. Limit 4 tickets per order.

Famed Farce Noises Off to Receive Resident Company Treatment With Comically Chaotic Revival at Baltimore’s Everyman Theatre

If you’re a theatre lover, you don’t want to miss this show wherever and whenever it is playing! This hilarious farce shows the real-world problems that can and inevitably arise during any production and relatable to every actor who has tread the boards! So excited for this production!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 25, 2017

 

Theatre’s Season Wraps with Sardines, Silliness and Split-Second Timing

Baltimore, MD – Everyman Theatre’s Resident Company of actors transforms into a British company of actors during the 1970s in this hotly anticipated revival of Tony Award-Winner Michael Frayn’s side-splitting farce to end all farces, Noises Off, directed by Founding Artistic Director Vincent M. Lancisi and running from May 17 through June 18, 2017.

With this love-letter to the thrilling unpredictability of the stage, Everyman Theatre ends its 2016/17 season on a zany note, joined by eight of its Resident Company members portraying a cast of bumbling British thesps (starring in the fictitious play-within-a-play, “Nothing On”) whose backstage buffoonery threatens to steal the show. With their opening night on London’s West End just hours away, can the cast pull their act together before lost lines, love triangles and flying sardines upstage the production?

Punctuated with wall-to-wall wackiness, carefully timed/choreographed hijinks, and spiked with color-popping 1970s pizazz and sight gags galore, Noises Off considers what happens when everything thatcan go wrong, does go wrong, earning laughs-a-minute from its talented cast.

“We’ve all heard the saying that ‘dying is easy, comedy is hard,’ but working within a Resident Company provides a level of family-like comfort for the actors that paves the way for hilarity of the highest caliber to ensue,” said Lancisi. “When audiences recognize our Resident Company members shifting between the characters they play, and the characters that those characters play (in the play within the play), it only adds to the infectious mayhem – literally tripling up on the fun.”

Resident Company members Deborah Hazlett (The Roommate, Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire, An Inspector Calls) and Danny Gavigan (A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, Ghosts, Deathtrap) lead the show-within-a-show cast as Dotty Otley, the top-billed star ofNothing On and Garry Lejeune, her leading man. They are joined by fellow Resident Company members Bruce Randolph Nelson (Great Expectations, Wait Until Dark, Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire) as Nothing On co-star Frederick Fellowes, Beth Hylton (A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, Outside Mullingar) as actress Belinda Blair, and Wil Love (Death of a Salesman, Outside Mullingar, Deathtrap) as Selsdon Mowbray, a veteran actor with a weakness for the bottle. The show-within-a-show cast is rounded out by Emily Kester, making her Everyman Theatre debut as the naïve actress Brooke Ashton.

Other featured Resident Company actors in Noises Off include Carl Schurr (Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire, Blithe Spirit) as Lloyd Dallas, the director of Nothing On, with Eric Berryman(Red, Topdog/Underdog, A Raisin in the Sun) and Megan Anderson (Dot, Wait Until Dark, Death of a Salesman, A Streetcar Named Desire), respectively, as stage manager Tim Allgood and assistant stage manager Poppy Norton-Taylor.

The Noises Off design team includes Resident Designer Company members Daniel Ettinger (Set Design), Jay A. Herzog (Lighting), Gary Logan (Dialects), Lewis Shaw (Fight Choreography) and Jillian Mathews (Props Master). Costume Design is provided by Eric Abele and Sound Design by Phillip Owen.

Noises Off first premiered in 1982 in London and opened in 1983 on Broadway where it received a Tony Award nomination for Best Play. Performed nearly nonstop ever since, Everyman Theatre’s production follows a recent Broadway revival produced by Roundabout Theatre Company.

Tickets for Noises Off are now on sale online (www.everymantheatre.org), by phone (410.752.2208), or at the Everyman Theatre Box Office (315 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201).

Event Listings

Pay-What-You-Can Performance
May 16, 2017 at 7:30 PM
Pay-What-You-Can (suggested minimum donation: $5) to see the final dress rehearsal of Noises Off. Tickets are sold on a first-come, first-serve basis at the Box Office beginning at 5:30pm. Tickets must be paid for in cash. Seating is general admission.

TNT: Theatre Night for Teens
May 16, 2017 at 6:00 PM
Students in grades 9-12 can enjoy dinner from Noodles & Company, an artist meet-and-greet withNoises Off prop master Jillian Matthews, and the 7:30 PM performance, followed by post-show discussion and dessert. Tickets: $10 each.

The Show Must Go On! A Stoop Storytelling Event
May 22, 2017 (Drinks/music at 6:00 PM; Performance at 7:30 PM)
Everyman and Stoop Storytelling partner to present an entertaining evening of hilarious-but-true stories about the unexpected pitfalls and pratfalls of the stage. Tickets: $20 each.

Taste of Everyman: Wacky Mix-Ups
June 1, 2017 at 6:00 PM
Mix and mingle with other theatre lovers during a pre-show social, this month featuring unique cocktail concoctions combining the most unexpected ingredients, and paired with hors d’oeuvres by The French Kitchen. Tickets: $60 each for show and event.

World of the Play
June 3, 2017 at 5:00 PM
Take part in an in-depth panel discussion on the themes and topics of the show, hosted by Marc Steiner (WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show). Tickets: $5 each (free for subscribers).

Salon Series: Women’s Voices: Trouble In Mind
June 5, 2017 (Cocktails at 6:00 PM; Performance at 7:00 PM)
A reading of Trouble In Mind by Obie Award-winning African-American playwright Alice Childress, directed by Resident Company member Dawn Ursula. Tickets: $15 each ($5 for students).

Cast Conversations
Jun 8, 2017 at 9:30 PM
Talk about the play with the members of the cast after the show. Free.

About Everyman Theatre

Everyman Theatre is a professional Equity theatre company celebrating the actor, with a Resident Company of artists from the Baltimore/DC area. Founded in 1990 by Vincent M. Lancisi, the theatre is dedicated to engaging the audience through a shared experience between actor and audience seeking connection and emotional truth in performance. Everyman is committed to presenting high quality plays that are affordable and accessible to everyone. The theatre strives to engage, inspire and transform artists, audiences and community through theatre of the highest artistic standards and is committed to embodying the promise of its name, Everyman Theatre.

Noises Off is presented by production sponsor University of Maryland, Baltimore. The 16/17 Season is generously sponsored by LifeBridge Health and Neil & Ellen Meltzer. Everyman Theatre’s Pay-What-You-Can nights are supported by Dr. E. Lee & Bea Robbins. Everyman Theatre is proud to have The Baltimore Sun Media Group and WYPR Season Media Sponsors. MSAC provides financial support and technical assistance to non-profit organizations, units of government, colleges and universities for arts activities. Funding for the Maryland State Arts Council is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Everyman Theatre is a proud member of the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Vincent M. Lancisi is the Founding Artistic Director of Everyman Theatre; Jonathan K. Waller is the Managing Director. For information about Everyman Theatre, visit www.everymantheatre.org or call 410.752.2208.

Everyman Theatre Blends Global Perspectives, Women’s Voices, and Truth-in-Storytelling for Transfixing, Entertaining 2017/18 Season

Everyman Theatre announces their 2017/18 Season and it’s filled with pieces by award winning authors as well as local folks, as well! Looks like an exciting season!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 21, 2017

 

Lineup Delivers Thought-Provoking Combination of Story and Character
Baltimore, MD – Following up on a successful year accentuated by record-breaking subscribership and trailblazing new work, Everyman Theatre announces the six-play lineup for its 2017/18 Season, celebrating actor-driven storytelling through a lens of global diversity and stories inspired by true-life events.

The season includes acclaimed works from four women playwrights, including the poignant, lauded Intimate Apparel, from two-time Pulitzer winner Lynn Nottage, Lauren Gunderson’s ruckus revisionist comedy, The Revolutionists, set during the Reign of Terror, only the second production of The Book of Joseph, the locally-inspired new play by Karen Hartman, and a co-production of Julia Cho’s deliciously touching drama Aubergine, in association with Olney Theatre Center.

Everyman will also stage two revivals next season, including Eugene O’Neill’s Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning masterpiece, Long Day’s Journey Into Night and, as previously announced, the gripping, Tony Award-winning drama M. Butterfly, by David Henry Hwang.

“Several overlapping themes organically emerged during the course of designing our newest season,” said Founding Artistic Director Vincent M. Lancisi. “From uplifting personal and collective legacies to unexpected truths hidden and discovered, Everyman Theatre’s 27th season gives voice to characters and experiences that are not ordinarily heard. Audiences can expect acting and storytelling of the highest caliber, along with a satisfying, stimulating mix of genres, tones and points of view. These are six amazing works designed to illuminate, startle, and surprise—come early, often, and with friends!”

“Whether it’s bold new work that inspires you, the incredible talent of our Resident Company of actors, or our mantra, ‘great stories, well told,’ Everyman’s newest season delivers on the core strengths that we—and our audiences—hold most dear,” said Managing Director Jonathan K. Waller. “Creating opportunities, experiences, and dialogues around great theatre is why we are here, and, through our mainstage, education and community engagement programs, we are delighted to provide so many ways for audiences to join along.”

Everyman Theatre 2017/18 Season:

M. Butterfly
By David Henry Hwang
Directed by Vincent M. Lancisi
September 6 – October 8, 2017
East meets west. Fact meets fiction. Illusion meets reality. When a powerful French diplomat becomes enchanted with a divine Peking opera star, little can quell the thirst of their intoxicating desire—but this diva is hiding more than her true identity. Celebrating its 30th anniversary this season, David Henry Hwang’s torrid and timeless Tony Award-winning M. Butterfly brings hide-and-seek to the stage in a gripping fable that proves the allure of fantasy and the power of obsession are a recipe for betrayal.

Intimate Apparel
By Lynn Nottage
October 18 – November 19, 2017
Wearing her heart on her sleeve while sewing intimates for her clientele, Esther is the talented African American seamstress in turn-of-the-century New York who has built a savings for herself making beautiful undergarments—while earnestly daydreaming of new beginnings, romantic possibilities, and the lingering affection she shares with a Jewish fabric merchant. But when an egregious deception cuts short heartfelt desires, can class, culture and circumstance outmatch the strength of human spirit? Inspired by a true story, Intimate Apparel is a heart-rending contemporary work in the style of an enduring classic—from the first female playwright to win two Pulitzers.

The Revolutionists
By Lauren Gunderson
December 6, 2017 – January 7, 2018
East Coast Premiere
Greetings from the French Revolution—where heads will roll. When you put former queen Marie Antoinette, assassin Charlotte Corday, playwright Olympe de Gouges, and Caribbean spy Marianne Angelle in a room together, literally ANYTHING can happen—especially big laughs! France’s fight for equality and freedom propels itself to modern times with this bold, brave and blisteringly funny new work about feminism, legacy and standing up for one’s beliefs. Who runs the world? The jury’s still out, but these girls sure as hell changed it.

Long Day’s Journey Into Night
By Eugene O’Neill
Directed by Donald Hicken
January 31 – March 4, 2018
What begins as an ordinary summer day at the Connecticut home of the Tyrone family morphs into a night filled with foggy, drink-laced demons where long-buried secrets are revealed – and once exposed cannot be ignored. A long-revered showcase for tour-de-force performances, Eugene O’Neill’s Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning masterpiece (published posthumously) lays bare what we all know to be true: the ardor of familial love cannot always protect you. Long Day’s Journey Into Night is an autobiographical insight into its late, legendary playwright – and a compassionately brutal look at one family’s struggle to fight for and love itself.

Aubergine
By Julia Cho
Directed by Vincent M. Lancisi
Produced in association with Olney Theatre Center
March 14 – April 15, 2018
Mid-Atlantic Premiere
When words fail, a home-cooked meal transcends differences in this touching story of intergenerational connectedness, forgiveness and the sweetest spice of life: love. As a Korean family struggles to relate across emotional and cultural divides, it’s the ingredients they share in common that lead to understanding. A perceptive and lyrical exploration of the act of cooking as a form of expression,Aubergine is a mouthwatering meditation on the beauty of life where hope is no mere ingredient—it’s the main course.

The Book of Joseph
By Karen Hartman – Based on the life of Joseph A. Hollander and his family
Directed by Noah Himmelstein
May 9 – June 10, 2018
East Coast Premiere
Like so many great mysteries, it all began in an attic with a dusty old suitcase… The discovery of a stash of letters stamped with Swastikas opens clues to an untold family history spanning multiple generations in The Book of Joseph—the gripping true story of resilience and truth-tracking determination spanning Baltimore and beyond. Richard Hollander’s book, Every Day Lasts a Year: A Jewish Family’s Correspondence from Poland, is brought to the stage in this mesmerizing new adaptation that restores a family’s uncharted legacy—celebrated by revelation and remembrance.

Tickets:

Subscriptions ($90-305) are now available for the 2017/18 season. Current subscribers must renew their subscriptions by June 18, 2017 in order to retain selected seats. New subscription orders will be accepted starting July 1, 2017. Single tickets go on sale August 1, 2017.

As part of Everyman’s ongoing commitment for making theatre affordable and accessible to a wide audience, new for the 2017/18 season is an expansion of the popular “Check Us Out” subscription package (available exclusively to new subscribers) which includes either Tuesday evening or firstSunday evening performances for all shows, for $100 or less.

Find more information, pricing and buy tickets online (www.everymantheatre.org), by phone(410.752.2208), or at the Everyman Theatre Box Office (315 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201).

About Everyman Theatre:

Everyman Theatre is a professional Equity theatre company celebrating the actor, with a Resident Company of artists from the Baltimore/DC area. Founded in 1990 by Vincent M. Lancisi, the theatre is dedicated to engaging the audience through a shared experience between actor and audience seeking connection and emotional truth in performance. Everyman is committed to presenting high quality plays that are affordable and accessible to everyone. The theatre strives to engage, inspire and transform artists, audiences and community through theatre of the highest artistic standards and is committed to embodying the promise of its name, Everyman Theatre.

MSAC provides financial support and technical assistance to non-profit organizations, units of government, colleges and universities for arts activities. Funding for the Maryland State Arts Council is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Everyman Theatre is a proud member of the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Vincent M. Lancisi is the Founding Artistic Director of Everyman Theatre; Jonathan K. Waller is the Managing Director. For information about Everyman Theatre, visit www.everymantheatre.org.

Review: Los Otros at Everyman Theatre

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Running Time: 90 minutes with no intermission

When people who come from different walks of life collide, directly or indirectly, one wonders how the two came together. What journey did they take to place one in the other’s life? Everyman Theatre’s latest offering, the premiere of Los Otros, with Book & Lyrics by Ellen Fitzhugh and Music by Michael John LaChiusa, Direction by Noah Himmelstein, and Music Direction by Jon Kalbfleisch gives us a glimpse into that journey and of the steps two characters take through life to cross each other’s path. I’d like to, if I may, give major kudos to Everyman Theatre, as well, for stepping out of their “comfort zone” of strictly plays and producing not only a musical but a brand new, commissioned musical, at that!

Judy McLane and Philip Hernandez. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Los Otros revolves around Lillian, a white woman, and Carlos, a Hispanic man, who both live in California and is told in a series of vignettes composed of their memories, reflections, and discoveries about themselves and the world around them between the years of 1938 and 1995. According to Everyman Theatre, “Inspiring, energetic and emotionally charged, this semi-autobiographical work captures a universal story of interconnectedness, love, risk and revelation through the lens of two people’s lives.”

Director Noah Himmelstein, Composer Michael John LaChiusa, Writer/Lyricist Ellen Fizhugh. Credit: Kirstin Pagan

The story of Los Otros itself is engaging and I feel for these characters and am genuinely interested in their lives and the stories they tell. The book by Ellen Fitzhugh is authentic and raw with simple storytelling that makes this piece so charming. For spanning so many years, it’s organized and easy to follow and the ending is certainly fitting and satisfying. Michael John LaChiusa’s music leaps off the page and is absolutely appropriate for this piece. I appreciate the hints of different styles representing different eras and though some of the melodies seem a little elementary, overall, the score is pleasing and well thought-out.

For as good as the music and book are, Lyrics, also by Fitzhugh, though good, in general, could use a little more editing. At points it seems Fitzhugh is trying too hard for a rhyme and over-telling the story through song. A couple of the pieces, such as “Arturo,” which is a still a good song, had many parts that sound more like a recitative that can be been spoken rather than trying to throw it into a song. That being said, Music & Lyrics, aside from a few minor, specific criticisms that may smooth out over time, work very well together for this piece as a whole.

Judy McLane. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Once again, Everyman Theatre has no disappointed with their beautiful set. Set Design by Daniel Ettinger is simple and minimal, yet elegant and appropriate for a production of compiled vignettes. Each character has his or her own main space on either side of the stage with shared space in the center. The use of sliding lattice and slight levels makes the setting interesting without taking away from the action of the piece. This is yet another fantastic set design from Daniel Ettinger.

Philip Hernandez and Judy McLane. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Lighting and Sound Design by Nancy Schertler and Ken Travis, respectively, also adds to this piece and does not distract from it. Both work in tandem to set the mood of each vignette and brings the audience into the piece subtly guiding the emotion of the action onstage.

David Burdick’s Costume Design is minimal, as it should be for a piece such as this, and each character is costumed befittingly with an wardrobe that is simple, but versatile enough add a piece or take away a piece to represent the different eras of the five decade timeline.

Music Direction is tackled by Jon Kalbfleisch and I would imagine that taking the musical reigns of a brand new piece can be challenging, even daunting, but if it is, Kalbfleisch does an exquisite job. Under his direction, the vocal performances and orchestra were well-rehearsed, giving us a superb final product.

Philip Hernandez. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Everyman Theatre’s new Associate Artistic Director, Noah Himmelstein, takes the reigns of this production and not only took on Direction of this new and re-imagined piece, but also had a hand in development. His vision is unpretentious, but innovative and effective. His vision is evident and he handles the material nicely and makes it relevant for today’s social and cross-cultured environment. The story is told clearly and the characters are precise making for an enjoyable and enlightening evening of theatre.

Both Judy McLane and Philip Hernandez, both experienced, veteran actors of stage and screen do an impeccable job bringing these characters to life and embodying them completely. Their performances are absolutely engaging and their storytelling is top notch. The connection between these two characters is gradual and clear and both McLane and Hernandez follow this connection at and equal pace impressively reaching the climax seamlessly and simultaneously.

Philip Hernandez. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Philip Hernandez takes on the role of Carlos, who goes on a journey of sexual identity, defining and finding love, and honoring culture and Hernandez plays it near flawlessly. He has a strong, confident presence and seems to really understand his character. Vocally, he gives an admirable performance with a clear voice that resonates beautifully throughout the theatre. Though, at times, the performance seemed a bit (just a bit) forced, his gradual change in demeanor during his storytelling of his childhood through adulthood is seamless and one is brought into an immersed in the story rather than just sitting on the outside listening making for a commendable and impressive performance.

Judy McLane. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Judy McLane as Lillian is an absolute joy to watch. She gives an outstanding, natural performance with an exceptional ability to tell a story. McLane presents the authenticity of her character tastefully but with a raw, unabashed undertone throughout the entire production. Life has thrown some curve balls at Lillian and McLane portrays it near perfectly. Her vocal performance is outstanding and strong even while smoothly (and brilliantly) acting her way through her songs. Overall, she gives a solid and remarkable performance.

Final thought… Los Otros at Everyman Theatre is basically a poignant coming-of-age tale spanning many decades and two different cultures. The simple storytelling is what makes this piece work so well and the music is fresh with hints of each decade it represents though the lyrics are a bit hokey and elementary, at times, while at other times, too much. The script is light as the concentration is on the music, but it is engaging and commanding. The journey these characters take us on is mixed with sadness, happiness, smooth sailing, and bumps in the road, but the ending of this story is worth the traveling. It’s always a pleasure and a privilege great to see new and re-imagined works at our larger small theatres in Baltimore and Everyman Theatre is to be commended for their work with this piece. This is definitely a production worthy of your time and consideration!

This is what I thought of Everyman Theatre’s production of Los Otros… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Los Otros will play through April 23 at Everyman Theatre, 315 West Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD. For Tickets, call the box office at 410-752-2208 or purchase them online.

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PRESS RELEASE: Los Otros Premiere Brings New Musical to Everyman Theatre from Tony Award Nominated Creative Team

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Newly Commissioned Reworking Explores Cross-Cultural Connections

Baltimore, MD – Everyman Theatre presents the Baltimore/DC Premiere of Los Otros, a timely new reworking of the musical from Tony Award nominees Michael John LaChiusa (music) and Ellen Fitzhugh (book and lyrics). Los Otros is currently in rehearsal and runs from March 22 through April 23, 2017.

Following its 2012 debut at the Mark Taper Forum, this compelling new reimagining is the result of an Everyman-commissioned workshop this past fall in New York City. Infused with compassionate, cross-cultural understanding, Los Otros bursts to life with an immersive set design, a vibrant score and two affecting lead performances – nearly entirely sung – from Broadway vets Judy McLane (Mamma Mia!) and Philip Hernandez (Kiss of the Spider Woman), backed by a live on-stage instrumental ensemble.

Through a series of beautiful and intimate vignettes, two Californians, Lillian and Carlos, reflect on profound moments from the past in which their individual experiences (as a white woman and Hispanic man) are linked by a collective sense of “otherness.” Juxtaposing such familiar human tensions as past/present, memory/mysticism and cultural/sexual identity, director Noah Himmelstein and musical director Jon Kalbfleisch command a production that is at once quietly perceptive and startlingly relevant in the context of today’s real-world social climate. Inspiring, energetic and emotionally charged, this semi-autobiographical work captures a universal story of interconnectedness, love, risk and revelation through the lens of two people’s lives.

“Ellen and Michael John are two of the most extraordinary thinkers in musical storytelling,” said Himmelstein. “The imaginative structure and near-cinematic breadth of Los Otros has inspired a visual design that echoes the experience of both characters, physically transforming as their stories unfold.”

“Commissioning this new version of Los Otros speaks to Everyman Theatre’s ardent belief in supporting important new work,” said Founding Artistic Director Vincent M. Lancisi. “Los Otros represents a profound investment in Ellen and Michael John’s creation, and the culmination of an intensive, ongoing collaboration between two great artists and this institution.”

los-otros-logoLos Otros is the first production directed by Noah Himmelstein under his new title of Associate Artistic Director at Everyman Theatre. A native of Baltimore, Noah previously directed the critically acclaimed production of An Inspector Calls during Everyman’s 2015/16 season. Mr. Himmelstein’s recent credits also include directing Andrew Lippa’s I Am Anne Hutchinson/I Am Harvey Milk at the Strathmore Center with Kristin Chenoweth, in addition to earlier incarnations of the work at Lincoln Center and in San Francisco and Los Angeles. He also recently directed Jonathan Tolins’ play The Forgotten Woman at Bay Street Theatre, Bleeding Love at the Fredericia Theatre in Denmark and the premiere of Michael Korie’s opera Positions 1956 in Washington, DCHe is a former assistant director to James Lapine and Bartlett Sher and a graduate of Emerson College.

Composer Michael John LaChiusa’s career includes multiple Tony Award nominations. His many scores include The Wild Party, Marie Christine, Hello Again, Giant, First Lady Suite, First Daughter Suite and See What I Wanna See. Lyricist and book writer Ellen Fitzhugh is the lyricist behind Grind on Broadway, several off-Broadway musicals, including Paper Moon, Herringbone, and Don Juan DeMarco and Paradise Found in London

Judy McLane (Lillian), whose Broadway credits include Kiss of the Spider WomanAspects of Love and Chess, co-stars as Lillian in Los Otros, her first Everyman Theatre production. After starring as Tanya in Mamma Mia! for nearly eight years, Ms. McLane stepped into the lead in the long-running ABBA tuner as Donna Sheridan in 2012, a role she played until the show’s run on Broadway ended in 2015. She received critical acclaim for her performance as Vienna in Johnny Guitar off-Broadway (Drama Desk Nomination and a Drama League Award for Distinguished Performance in the Theater). Most recently, she starred as Diana in Next to Normal at the Pioneer Theater.

Philip Hernandez (Carlos), who first appeared on Broadway in the original cast of the Tony Award-winning musical Kiss of the Spider Woman, co-stars as Carlos in Los Otros, his Everyman Theatre debut. He is the only man in Broadway history to play both Jean Valjean and Inspector Javert in Les Miserables. Mr. Hernandez played opposite Marc Anthony and Ruben Blades in the original Broadway cast of Paul Simon’s The Capeman. His career goes beyond Broadway, having sung with symphony orchestras throughout the U.S. and recorded a Latin jazz album with a big band.

McLane and Hernandez have previously appeared together in Kiss of the Spider Woman on Broadway and in Man of LaMancha at Paper Mill Playhouse.

Tickets for Los Otros are now on sale online (www.everymantheatre.org), by phone (410.752.2208), or at the Everyman Theatre Box Office (315 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD 21201). Two-play subscription packages are also available, and include the upcoming Resident Company production of Noises Off (May 17 through June 18, 2017).

Event Listings

Pay-What-You-Can Performance

March 19, 2017 at 7:00 PM

March 21, 2017 at 7:30 PM

TNT: Theatre Night for Teens

March 21, 2017 at 6:00 PM

Students in grades 9-12 can enjoy dinner by Two Boots Pizza, an artist meet-and-greet, the play, and post-show discussion and dessert. Tickets: $10 each.

Salon Series: Women’s Voices: The Language Archive

March 27, 2017 (Cocktails at 6:00 PM; Performance at 7:00 PM)

A reading of Julia Cho’s The Language Archive, a heartfelt comedy exploring the power of words and the capacity of language to fail or save us. Tickets: $15 each ($5 for students).

Taste of Everyman: California Bounty

April 6, 2017 at 6:00 PM

Mix and mingle with other theatre lovers during a pre-show social, this month featuring California wines paired with hors d’oeuvres by The French Kitchen. Tickets: $60 each for show and event.

World of the Play

April 8, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Take part in an in-depth panel discussion on the themes and topics of the show, hosted by Marc Steiner (WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show). Tickets: $5 each (free for subscribers).

Cast Conversations

April 13, 2017 at 9:30 PM

Talk about the play with the members of the cast after the show. Free.

About Everyman Theatre

Everyman Theatre is a professional Equity theatre company celebrating the actor, with a Resident Company of artists from the Baltimore/DC area. Founded in 1990 by Vincent M. Lancisi, the theatre is dedicated to engaging the audience through a shared experience between actor and audience seeking connection and emotional truth in performance. Everyman is committed to presenting high quality plays that are affordable and accessible to everyone. The theatre strives to engage, inspire and transform artists, audiences and community through theatre of the highest artistic standards and is committed to embodying the promise of its name, Everyman Theatre.

Los Otros is executive produced by Susan W. Flanigan. Additional support is provided by Producers’ Circle donors: Beth Goldsmith, Gina & Dan Hirschhorn, George Roche, Shen Family Foundation, The Stockman Family Foundation, and Lawrence Yumkas & Miriam Fisher. The 16/17 Season is generously sponsored by LifeBridge Health and Neil & Ellen Meltzer. Everyman Theatre’s Pay-What-You-Can nights are supported by Dr. E. Lee & Bea Robbins. Everyman Theatre is proud to have The Baltimore Sun Media Group and WYPR Season Media Sponsors. MSAC provides financial support and technical assistance to non-profit organizations, units of government, colleges and universities for arts activities. Funding for the Maryland State Arts Council is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Everyman Theatre is a proud member of the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

Vincent M. Lancisi is the Founding Artistic Director of Everyman Theatre; Jonathan K. Waller is the Managing Director. For information about Everyman Theatre, visit www.everymantheatre.org or call 410.752.2208.

Review: Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations at Everyman Theatre

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

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Running Time: 2 hours and 20 minutes with one 15-minute intermission

We are introduced to Charles Dickens at a very early age, especially around the holidays and, namely, Christmas, with his crazy-popular A Christmas Carol (which, incidentally, is the “scary ghost stories” in that Christmas standard “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,”… in case you’ve always been wondering) but that is not his only work. Many schools also use his novels in standard curriculum and, as an English major in college, I was yet again exposed to his labors and I’ve got to admit, right here and right now… I was not and am not a fan of Mr. Dickens or his writing, but I do appreciate his stories, which helps… a little.

The Cast of GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

The Cast of GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

However, that being said, the latest offering at Everyman Theatre, Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations, Adapted by Gale Childs Daly, Directed by Tazewell Thompson, with Set Design by Yu-Hsuan Chen, Lighting Design by Stephen Quandt, Sound Design by Fabian Obispo, and Costume Design by David Burdick has absolutely given me a reason to be a fan and thoroughly enjoy the work of Charles Dickens. Regardless of your familiarity with this tale, you won’t be disappointed with Everyman Theatre’s production.

In a nutshell, Great Expectations (the novel) is a self-narrated coming-of-age story an (abused) orphan named Pip, and his life journey from poverty to wealth, the people with whom he meets and parts ways, some good, some bad, and some in-between, love, lost love, and his inevitable self-realization and humbling.

The Cast of GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

The Cast of GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

As I have stated in previous reviews for Everyman Theatre, they never disappoint when it comes to Set Design and Yu-Hsuan Chen pulled out all the stops for this production. Chen’s use of the space is spectacular, giving the actors ample space to move around to keep the action interesting and the attention to detail is second to none. The set alone sets the mood for this piece and the artistry of this faded, derelict setting is superb. Kudos to Yu-Hsuan for a job well done.

The Cast of GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

The Cast of GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Lighting Design by Stephen Quandt and Sound Design by Fabian Obispo worked nicely in tandem to create a subtle but effective visual and auditory sensory presentation to move the story along, giving the audience perspective of time and space while not confusing the plot and situations therein.

Pulling together the production side of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations is David Burdick’s excellent Costume Design. Designing for a period piece can be challenging but Burdick really has a grasp on the Dickens era and his design is spot on and authentic, adding great value to the production as a whole.

(l to r) Drew Kopas, Elizabeth Anne Jernigan, and Franchelle Stewart Dorn.  Credit: ClintonBPhotography

(l to r) Drew Kopas, Elizabeth Anne Jernigan, and Franchelle Stewart Dorn. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Taking an old classic and making it new for new audiences is tough, especially when it comes to Charles Dickens stories or anything in stuffy, staunch Dickens/Victorian era, really, but Tazewell Thompson takes the reigns and masterfully weaves this for a 21st century audience without really changing the setting or the story, but giving it a fresh look by getting back to basics of story-telling. Thompson gives us a mix of broken-fourth-wall story-telling and re-enactment that meshes perfectly to tell this story in a way that is easy to follow and understand. I will admit, at first, it took a moment to get into the rhythm of this mix but once you are settled in and connect with these storytellers, the story unfolds effortlessly. More importantly, Thompson seems to really understand these characters and their objectives, moving them smoothly through the story.  Working with Gale Childs Daly’s able adaptation, Thompson gives us an entertaining, accessible piece that makes for a genuinely enjoyable evening of theatre.

(l to r) Drew Kopas and Franchelle Stewart Dorn. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

(l to r) Drew Kopas and Franchelle Stewart Dorn. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

The ensemble work in this piece is outstanding and all of these actors work well with each other and play various roles to tell this tale. Gerrad Alex Taylor and Elizabeth Anne Jernigan, listed as Narrator #2 and Narrator #4 in the program, respectively, also take on the very important roles of Pips friends such as Herbert, Pip’s ever faithful friend and confidant (played by Taylor) and Estelle, Pip’s love interest and main inspiration for acquiring a higher status in life (played by Jernigan). Taylor’s portrayal of Herbert makes him a very likable character and Jernigan plays Estelle with a coldness and bitterness befitting of the character and her presentation of the character’s change is authentic and heartwarming. Both of these actors are very comfortable with their characters and give admirable performances.

Drew Kopas as Pip is charming as he takes his character from boyhood to adulthood. It is easy to connect with this character from the start and Kopas keeps that connection with the audience throughout the entire production. His subtle voice and manner change as Pip grows and journeys through life is quite impressive giving the feel of this young man growing up right before our eyes. Taking on the main character of this piece, Kopas gives an outstanding and intelligent performance that is to be commended.

(l to r) Gerrad Alex Taylor and Brit Herring. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

(l to r) Gerrad Alex Taylor and Brit Herring. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Brit Herring as Joe is absolutely heart-warming. In the program, he is listed simply as Narrator #5 but, like his cohorts, he tackles multiple roles in this piece but his portrayal as Joe, Pip’s warm and loving brother-in-law, is stellar. His ability to switch between completely different characters and keep them separate makes his performance a joy to watch.

Among the talented and dedicated ensemble, Bruce Randolph Nelson and Franchelle Stewart Dorn are definite highlights.

Bruce R. Nelson and Drew Kopas. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Bruce R. Nelson and Drew Kopas. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Bruce Randolph Nelson (an Everyman Theatre Resident Company Member) is listed as Narrator #1 but also takes on the role of Magwitch, a raw, crude convict who happens to run into a very young and helpful Pip and he absolutely nails this character both in physicality and vocality. He also gives a brilliant performance in the role of Uncle Pumblechook, who has a part in moving Pip along during his journey. Unlike the sloth-like, slow, heavy character described in the novel, Nelson makes the choice to take this character in another humorous and flamboyant direction that is making for an undoubtedly successful performance.

Franchelle Stewart Dorn as Miss Havisham. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Franchelle Stewart Dorn as Miss Havisham. Credit: ClintonBPhotography

Franchelle Stewart Dorn is credited as Narrator #3 but takes on the very important roles of Mrs. Joe, Pip’s much older sister, and Miss Havisham, the bitter, jilted, and wealthy old lady who lives in the very large house down the street. Dorn is an absolute pleasure to watch. As Mrs. Joe, she’s forceful, crude, and loud, as the character requires and as Miss Havisham, she oozes bitterness and contempt, but Dorn manages to get the audience to pity this character she embodies. It’s worth noting, I could listen to this woman talk for hours. Dorn’s voice is smooth and booming as it resonates through the entire theatre and every word is crystal clear allowing for an impressive and superb performance.

Final thought…Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations at Everyman Theatre is a brand new take on an old classic. It’s refreshing, entertaining, and accessible that it opens up to a new generation that may have otherwise let it sit on the bookshelf to collect dust. This adaptation handles the many subplots and twists beautifully with a perfect blend of old-fashioned story-telling and re-enactment while the production itself is well thought-out and the impeccable casting of a very capable ensemble make this a show you want to check out. Whether you’re familiar with Charles Dickens’ work or not and whether you’re a fan or not, this production will introduce you to this story either again or for the first time with a fresh and energizing telling.

This is what I thought of Everyman Theatre’s production of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations will play through March 5 at Everyman Theatre, 315 West Fayette Street, Baltimore, MD. For Tickets, call the box office at 410-752-2208 or purchase them online.

Email us at backstagebaltimore@gmail.com

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