Review: Heathers the Musical at How Do You Like Me Now Productions

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

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Running Time: Approx. 2 hours and 30 minutes with a 15-minute intermission

***NOTE: Heathers the Musical at How Do You Like Me Now Productions ended its run on Sunday, October 29***

To ask the age old question of the wisest men… What’s your damage?! Well, How Do You Like Me Now (HDYLMN) Productions, in association with Erase the Hate Through Art, is trying to answer that question with their most recent production of Heathers the Musical with Book, Music, & Lyrics by Laurence O’Keefe and Kevin Murphy, Directed by Ed Higgins, Music Direction by Andrew Zile, and Choreography by Kristen Rigsby. Based on a quirky film from 1989 of the same name (minus the Musical) Heathers the Musical takes us through a journey of popularity, the repercussions of that popularity, teen angst, and all those crazy things and ups and downs that happen during our teenage years.

In a nutshell, Heathers the Musical is about Veronica Sawyer, a teen outcast turned popular kid who hooks up with the most popular kids in school, the Heathers, and learns that being at the top isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Enter Jason Dean (JD) an angsty, trench coat wearing, dark and brooding new kid who shows Veronica there’s more than one way to stop the bullies from bullying.

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(l-r) Ellie Parks, Bryce Gudelsky, and Emily Wesselhoff. Photo: Shealyn Jae Photography

The Studio Theatre at Chesapeake Center for the Arts is a great space to see a show, it’s not too big and not too small, especially for a show like Heathers the Musical. Set/Technical Design by Josh Anderson is completely minimal with no real set to speak of, but his use of projections is clever and the set pieces are well thought-out and chosen wisely. Some of the scene transitions are a bit lengthy and clunky, but the crew gets the job done and are ready when the lights come up.

Costume Design by Grant Myers is on point for this production. It’s always fun to see the style of a bygone era and the 80s were a doozy! You never knew what you were going to see in the halls of a high school and everything was always so unique, even within cliques. One hiccup might be the repeated mention of JD’s trench coat but… no trench coat. Regardless, it’s a great design and Myers’ attention to detail is admirable and authentic, adding great value to this piece.

It’s worth saying that Choreography by Kristen Rigsby is certainly a highlight of this production. Every group number has variety, is well rehearsed, and tight making for some delightful moments. Rigsby seems to know her cast and the choreography emphasizes their strengths making every number look splendid. Her instincts to match her dances to the music are remarkable and the cast seems to be having a great time performing her choreography. Kudos to Rigsby for a job well done!

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Luis Mentes and Olivia Winter. Photo: Shealyn Jae Photography

Music Director Andrew Zile should be commended for his work on this piece as he had his cast in harmony and singing strong. At no fault of Zile’s I wish I could have heard more of his work but, since the cast isn’t amplified with microphones and there is practically a full orchestra, I strained to hear the singers through much of the production. Speaking of the orchestra, there are many consisting of Andrew Zile as Conductor/Synthesizer, W. William Zellhoffer on Piano, Eric Allard on Violin, Ian Lyons on Reeds, Steven Bailey on Trumpet, David Kistler on Guitar, Kevin Jones on Bass, and Winfield Clasing on Drums, but they sound phenomenal! They are tight and spot on in every number. There are a few hiccups with pitch and timing but, overall, Zile has a great grasp of the score and guides this cast nicely.

Ed Higgins takes the reigns of this production and he does seem to have a good comprehension of the text and story and, though his space has its limitations, there are some curious choices for scene settings, such as the corner of the theatre where, depending on where you are sitting, you can’t see or hear much of what’s going on. He has assembled a good cast and they have a fantastic chemistry that is clear throughout the production. The quirkiness required of this piece wasn’t as apparent as it should have been, but it is a well put-together production that gives an enjoyable evening of theatre.

Concerning the performance of this piece, this ensemble is strong and committed. All in the ensemble give a praiseworthy performance and should be applauded.

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(l-r) Michael Leard and Zach Husak. Photo: Shealyn Jae Photography

Ram Sweeney and Kurt Kelley are played by Zach Husak and Michael Leard, respectively and give a hilarious portrayal of stereotypical jocks of the school. Their comedic timing is near perfect and they play well off each other. Vocally, they don’t give the strongest showing, especially with the higher register in the songs and lean more on the comedy of the absurd but, overall, give humorous, strong performances.

In this particular performance, Veronica Sawyer (who is usually portrayed by Olivia Winter) is portrayed by Linda Roby and she gives an admirable performance. As mentioned, no one is amplified with microphones and Roby didn’t project as well as she could have making her hard to hear, at times. Also, some of the songs may have been above her comfortable register as she seems to strain on the high notes, but she seems to understand the character very well and portrays the teenaged angst extremely well.

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Luis Mentes and Olivia Winter. Photo: Shealyn Jae Photography

JD (Jason Dean), the brooding, dark new kid is played by Luis Montes and he gives a strong, confident performances but he seems to have a bit too much urgency than is called for this character who is usually laid back and cool. However, he makes the role his own and makes for a respectable presentation. Vocally, he does well, overall, with a few strains here and there, but nothing that spoils his performance as a whole.

The Heathers, the pinnacle of the Westerberg High School pyramid, are played flawlessly by Bryce Gudelsky as Heather Chandler, Ellie Parks as Heather McNamara, and Emily Wesselhoff as Heather Duke. All three of these ladies have a great chemistry and exude the bitchiness that is The Heathers. Gudelsky embodies Heather Chandler and all her power and wails on her featured number “Candy Store.” All the while Parks, as Heather McNamara, plays the follower near perfectly, portraying an insecurity and need to be accepted through her mannerisms and delivery and can almost bring the audience to tears in her poignant number, “Life Boat.” Last but not least, Wesselhoff as the bottom Heather on the totem pole, Heather Duke, portrays this Heater beautifully.  Her gradual change in position throughout the production is seamless and makes for a strong, poised performance that is to be commended. Vocally, Wesselhoff is a powerhouse and belts out her part in featured numbers such as “Candy Store,” “Big Fun,” and “Shine a Light (Reprise).”

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Jim Gross as Ram’s Dad. Photo: Shealyn Jae Photography

A few highlights include Kristen Demers as Martha Dunstock (Dumptruck), Jim Gross as Ram’s Dad, and Jennifer Alexander as Ms. Flemming. All three of these supporting actors give strong and focused performances that are definitely worth mentioning. Jim Gross (who also plays the lurking Coach), gives a side-tickling performance as Ram’s Dad, confidently belting out his featured, gospel-inspired number, “My Dead Gay Son,” while Jennifer Alexander does the same, impeccably belting out her inspiring featured number, “Shine a Light.”

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Kristen Demers as Martha Dunstock. Photo: Shealyn Jae Photography

Kristen Demers tackles the role of Martha Dunstock, or Dumptruck, as the other kids call her, who is kind of the embodiment of all the outcasts and bullied kids at school. Her portrayal is funny, moving, and spot on, making the audience feel for her from the start. Demers is not afraid of the role and makes it her own, making for a strong, meaningful performance. Vocally, she starts out strong in her featured number, “Kindergarten Boyfriend,” but loses a bit of steam toward the end of the song. She does act out the song like a champ, but at the sacrifice of the music. Regardless, her performance is spot on and leaves a lasting impression.

Final thought…Heathers the Musical is a great piece of theatre when it doesn’t take itself too seriously. Director Ed Higgins states it was chosen as it goes along with the mission of HDYLMN Productions to start a dialogue about bullying and suicide, which this piece presents humorously, but with a serious message. I can tell HDYLMN Productions are apt and able to put on some great shows but, though this production yields some very good qualities, overall, it falls a little flat whether it be because of sound issues, pacing, or directorial choices. The performances, for the most part, are commendable, the choreography is an absolute joy to watch, and the cast seems to be having a great time, giving 100% effort and dedication. That’s not to say this isn’t a good show, because it certainly is, but I’m looking forward to seeing what HDYLMN Productions can really do!

This is what I thought of How Do You Like Me Now’s production of Heathers the Musical… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Heathers the Musical has ENDED its run but played through October 29 at How Do You Like Me Now Productions in the Black Box Theatre space of The Chesapeake Arts Center, 194 Hammonds Lane in Brooklyn Park, MD.

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Review: Clue the Musical at Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

 

Running Time: Approx. 2 hours with one 15-minute intermission

You may be familiar with the board game of who killed someone with what and where, or you may be familiar with the 1985 slapstick, farcical, star-studded comedy film with a script I can recite in my sleep. Either way, if you know either of these things, you’re familiar with something known as Clue! And if you’re not, you should be! You can start with Artistic Synergy of Baltimore’s latest offering, Clue the Musical (Book by Peter De Pietro and Music by Galen Blum, Wayne Barker, and Vinnie Martucci, with Lyrics by Tom Chiodo), Directed by Nickolas Epps, with Music Direction by Jeff Baker, and Choreography by Temple Forston. It’s worth mentioning, if you are an uber-fan of the film, like I am, you will not see any of that here, but you will see the same zany characters and will be in for an amusing evening of an original story and music that may or may not help you solve this musical murder-mystery!

Hasheem Brin as Mr. Green. Credit: Artistic Synergy

Set Design by Nickolas Epps, Emma Hawthron, and Temple Forston is minimal but suits this production. A few chairs, a makeshift bar, a small desk, a rickety table that I think is supposed to represent a pool table, and a printed backdrop of the layout of the mansion is all that dons the stage and, though a little more effort could have been put into the design, it works well for this piece and the space.

Temple Forston takes on the duties of Choreographer and, this too is minimal. Some box steps and hand gestures make up the majority of the choreography and I’m wondering if the musical numbers would have been better suited to blocking rather than choreography. None of the choreography really stood out but, to her credit, Forston does give the actors simple, but appropriate moves and it blends well with the performance though it could be tightened up a bit.

Rick Long as Colonel Mustard. Credit: Artistic Synergy

Though a Costume Designer is not listed in the program, Epps states in his Director’s Note that along with having the opportunity to direct for the first time, this is also his hand in Costume Design. The costumes, I must say, are top notch and near perfect for each character. Each has his or her own, individual style and the costumes bring these characters to life. From Miss Scarlet’s slinky red dress to Mrs. White’s authentic, traditional maid outfit the costumes are impressive and kudos to Epps for his handy-work.

Wayne Ivusich as Professor Plumb. Credit: Artistic Synergy

Music Director Jeff Baker, a veteran of the Baltimore theatre scene who does great work did seem to have his challenges in this production. First, this production uses canned (recorded) music and it only features the piano. Running through the sound system, it sounds “tinny” at times but the cast does a fantastic job following along. Vocally, the cast does an admirable job with the songs given to them, even if the songs are a bit blasé and elementary (the songs themselves, not the performances of the songs). Harmonies come and go and energy is a bit low but, again, it’s mainly the material and not the performances. Aside from a few missed lyrics, the cast get through the score and Baker did the best he could with the material given to him.

Stacey Cosden as The Detective. Credit: Artistic Synergy

Director Nickolas Epps takes the reigns of this production of Clue the Musical and as a first time director, Epps does a commendable showing and the missteps taken will be ironed out with experience. This particular show doesn’t call for a ton of blocking but there seems to be nil to none in this production. Actors enter, they stand center stage (or elsewhere), recite their lines, and exit. Though one has to pay attention to the dialogue, the scenes fell a bit flat because of lack of movement to make it interesting. The individual character work is good and each actor found his or her own twist on these well-known characters. Transitions were a little messy and the comedic timing is a bit off but those are things that can be fixed as the run moves along. Casting is near perfect and each actor fit nicely and believably into his or her character. I respect Epps for taking on a full-fledged musical as his first foray into directing and I understand it can be overwhelming. However, Epps, with the minor first-time Director stumbles, seems to have handled it well.

Olivia Winter as Miss Scarlet. Credit: Artistic Synergy

It’s always difficult to portray such well-known characters and the characters of Clue the Musical are quite well-known. This is mostly because of the 1987 film and not necessarily the board game, and this makes it even more difficult for an actor. However, the ensemble for this piece is a small one and each and every one of them give 100% to their performances. They are a dedicated bunch and make the most of their characters giving some strong portrayals.

Hasheem Brin takes on the role of the conniving Mr. Green and though he is scripted and seems a little uncomfortable and scripted at times, he gives a respectable performance and Olivia Winter, as Miss Scarlet, definitely has the look and mannerisms down pat. Meanwhile, Stacy Cosden takes on the role of the no-nonsense Detective (a rather new character to the Clue universe), who shows up toward the end of Act I. Cosden is confident and seems to understand her character, giving a commendable performance.

Colonel Mustard and Professor Plum are portrayed by Rick Long and Wayne Ivusich, respectably. These two gentlemen are well cast and completely embody these characters. Long, as Col. Mustard, is committed and rigid, as the character should be and has a great look for the role. Ivusich, as Professor Plumb, wholly becomes this scheming, pretentious gentlemen and his British accent is spot on. Both give delightful performances.

Ashley Gerhardt as Mrs. Peacock. Credit: Artistic Synergy

As the promiscuous Miss Scarlet, Olivia Winter is a perfect match for this character and she gives a strength and confidence to this role. With her slinky red dress, she doesn’t over-do the promiscuity and actually portrays Miss Scarlet with a certain amount of vulnerability making for a lovely portrayal. Ashly Gerhardt tackles the portrayal of my favorite character, Mrs. Peacock. Gerhardt takes this role and runs with it. She’s not trying to be a carbon-copy of the film version of Mrs. Peacock and she adds her own flair which makes for a superb performance. Vocally, Gerhardt is stunning and gives a kick to the rather uninteresting songs as in her featured number, “Once a Widow.”

Ciahna Heck as Mrs. White. Credit: Artistic Synergy

Rounding out the cast is James Gilbert as Mr. Boddy and Ciahna Heck as Mrs. White, two highlights of this production. Gilbert has a great command of the stage and gives a confident and authentic performance as the character who helps the audience along throughout. He could cut some of the adlibbing and asides that break his character and become somewhat annoying, but he has a great grasp of his character and is believable. Vocally, Gilbert has a smooth bass/baritone that resonates throughout the theatre and makes one take notice as in numbers like “The Game” and “The Murder.”

James Gilbert as Mr. Boddy. Credit: Artistic Synergy

Ciahna Heck knocks it out of the ballpark as Mrs. White. Her British/cockney accent is on point and one can tell she’s giving her all for this role. She has a stupendous command of the stage and is very natural making for a superior performance. Along with her character, Heck is a standout, vocally, with a strong soprano (and singing in accent) that is well fitting in her featured song “Life is a Bowl of Pits.”

Overall, the entire ensemble has a good chemistry, allowing them to work well off of each other and with each other making for a pleasing evening of comedy-murder-mystery theatre.

Final thought… Clue the Musical is NOT my favorite show of the season but not because of the performers or performances… just the show itself! It is a humorous and nostalgic presentation of a familiar board game I spent hours playing as a child. However, if you are a fan of the 1985 film (of which I DEFINITELY am), you’ll see the characters have the same names, but you won’t see any of those rib-tickling one liners or crazy characters that made the film a cult classic. Clue the Musical takes these sinister characters and gives them a comical turn with upbeat songs and convoluted situations that leaves the audience scratching their heads until the ultimate reveal at the end of the evening. The script is a bit trite, the canned music is traditional and a bit uninspiring, but the performances are dedicated and quite admirable. I wonder… will you be able to figure out whodunit?

This is what I thought of Artistic Synergy of Baltimore’s production of Clue the Musical… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Clue the Musical will play through September 17 at Artistic Synergy of Baltimore at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 8212 Philadelphia Road, Baltimore, MD. For tickets, purchase them at the door or purchase them online.

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Review: Bye Bye Birdie at Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

Running Time: 2 hours with one 15-minute intermission

The Cast of Bye Bye Birdie. Credit: Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

The 1950s was an interesting, white picket fenced, bobby socked, and black and white time in America and, though problems were bubbling under the surface, it was a simpler time. Elvis Presley broke through with his pelvis-shaking rock and roll, but there was still a certain innocence to his bad-boy persona and we couldn’t get enough. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore’s latest production, the classic Bye Bye Birdie with a Book by Michael Stewart, Music by Charles Strouse, and Lyrics by Lee Adams, takes us back to that bygone era and to a small town to give us a taste of nostalgia and a peek into 1950s suburbia. Bye Bye Birdie is Directed by Jeff Baker (who may or may not have been the Music Director, as well, since a Music Director is not listed in the program), with Choreography by Suzy Hasselbush, Set Design by Colby Aerford, Daniel DeJong, and Stanton Zacker, and Costumes by Amy Rudi.

Set Design by Colby Aerford, Daniel DeJong and Stanton Zacker is innovative, considering the space they had to work with. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore certainly doesn’t have the smallest stage in Baltimore, but it is still an intimate space and the use of spinning flats for different scene settings is practical and efficient. They don’t clutter the stage too much with set pieces but a few well-placed items give the idea of where the action is taking place and leaves space for the large cast. The painting and detail work by Ann Pallanck and Amy Rudai expresses the time period very nicely with bright, light colors and sets the mood nicely. The minimal, but appropriate Set Design adds value to this production, as a whole.

The Cast of Bye Bye Birdie. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Amy Rudai also took on the duties as Costume Designer and this aspect of the production is certainly a highlight. Rudai’s attention to detail is impressive and instead of going with the usual poodle skirts, saddle shoes, and cardigans, she manages to give us an authentic representation of the time in which this piece is set with below the knee knitted skirts, plain white athletic shoes for the young ladies, and plain jeans, Jack Purcell-looking shoes, and t-shirts/sweaters for the young gentlemen and suits and dresses for the adult cast. The Conrad Birdie costume could have had a bit more pizazz and glamour rather than looking like an ordinary “greaser” and the wardrobe for Rosie Alvarez look a bit out of place (I keep thinking 80s for some reason – could be the broad shoulder jackets) and a particular costume in Act II for “Spanish Rose” is unnecessary but overall, the costume choices are spot on and Rudai’s work is impeccable.

Choreography by Suzy Hasselbush is charming and appropriate for her cast. It’s obvious she knows her cast and has choreographed accordingly which is of the utmost importance for any choreographer. Now, that’s not to say anything is dumbed down for this cast. There are some impressive numbers including the opening “The Telephone Hour” and the trio for “Put on a Happy Face.” Hasselbush’s work lights up the stage and keeps this piece interesting.

The Cast of Bye Bye Birdie. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Baltimore theatre veteran Jeff Baker takes on Direction of this production and does a superb job. He understands the piece well and even though it’s musical comedy and poking fun at 1950s middle America, he takes it just seriously enough to tell the coming of age story in a meaningful way. He doesn’t shove the fact of the 1950s down our throats with clichés and obvious bits, but let’s the story unfold through the script and the performances. His casting is decent and he’s given us a well thought-out production.

Since no Music Director is listed in the program, I’m going to assume Mr. Baker took on those duties as well, knowing he has taken on this role in numerous productions in the past. The ensemble, as a whole, sounds fantastic and they blend well and harmonize together beautifully. The musical numbers are well rehearsed but it is unfortunate that it was decided to use canned music for this production (that’s recorded music, for those who might not be in “the know”). Bye Bye Birdie has such a wonderful score, it may have been nice to hear a live orchestra playing along supporting this dedicated ensemble. There were some hick-ups, skips and missed musical cues for actors that may have been smoothed out if a live orchestra and conductor were in attendance, but overall, the cast was ready and worked well with the recorded music.

Jennifer Hasselbush and Stanton Zacker. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Moving into the performance aspect of Bye Bye Birdie, Stanton Zacker and Jennifer Hasselbush take on the roles of Harry and Doris MacAfee, the poor, defeated parents of Kim MacAfee and Randall MacAfee, with the former having been chosen to give heartthrob Conrad Birdie one last kiss before being shipped off to the Army. Both of these actors were dedicated and comfortable with their roles and portrayed them nicely. Hasselbush somehow embodied a mother of the 1950s and is very authentic in her interactions with her family making for a strong performance. Zacker is a bit scripted and lets some golden one-liners zoom right past but he is still believable as the frazzled father of a teenaged girl and his chemistry with his fellow cast mates is strong. Vocally, Zacker is impressive, as is Jennifer Hasselbush. In numbers such as “Hymn for a Sunday Evening” and the popular and standard “Kids” they were entertaining and gave very respectable performances.

Matt Peterson as Conrad Birdie. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

The role of Conrad Birdie… the Birdie of Bye Bye Birdie, is tackled by Matt Peterson and he gives a good showing of the heartthrob, pop icon, Elvis Presley-esque character but, overall, I would have liked a little more suave, brooding, sex appeal and charisma. Yes, again, it’s a musical comedy, but if you’re gonna play a character inspired by Elvis Presley… work it, especially the charisma! The costume may have had a hand in it as well, as stated before, being dressed in just some jeans, a t-shirt, converse shoes, and a leather jacket. He looked more like a T-Bird from Grease than the most famous man in the country. However, that being said, Matt Peterson does NOT give a terrible performance does an admirable job in this role. He is dedicated to this role and certainly looks the part. He’s comfortable and does have a strong stage presence as well as a terrific, albeit soft, voice.

Melissa Broy Forston as Mae Peterson. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Melissa Broy Forston takes on the hilarious role of Mae Peterson, the helicopter mom (when helicopter moms weren’t cool) who hounds and guilt trips her adult son into seeing things her way. Forston takes this role and hits the ground running. She’s confident with a strong stage presence and her comedic timing is splendid. She understands this character and the humor and embraces both giving a strong performance.

Hunter Lubawski as Kim MacAfee. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Hunter Lubawski takes on the role of Kim MacAfee, the sweet, naive teenager who wants to grow up too fast. Lubawski is cast perfectly as this character and she’s comfortable in this role. She gives a worthy vocal performance and is radiant in her numbers such as “How Lovely to Be a Woman” and “One Boy,” exuding that innocence and tenderness this character requires and her transition from young child to young woman is subtle but certain and her performance is commendable.

Olivia Winter as Ursula Merkel. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Often, you’ll see a performer in a supporting role who just stands out in a production and in this production that performer is Olivia Winter as Ursula Merkel, Kim’s fanatic, loyal, and number-one-Birdie-fan. Winter is definitely a highlight of this production because of her enthusiasm and dedication to her role. She’s got a beautiful voice that is highlighted in numbers such as “The Telephone Hour” and her character choices for this role are near perfect. She shines during ensemble numbers like “A Normal American Boy” and “Honestly Sincere” with her natural and confident performance. I’m looking forward to seeing future performances from this young actress.

Alana DiSabatino as Rosie Alvarez. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Taking on the role of Rosie Alvarez, the loyal, love-lorn, secretary, and girlfriend of Albert Peterson is Alana DiSabatino. DiSabatino has a good command of the stage and does an admirable job with this challenging role and seems quite comfortable and dedicated. She understands her character and embodies the objectives and wants of Rosie, namely, becoming Mrs. Albert Peterson. She certainly entertains and keeps things moving in solo numbers including “What Did I Ever See in Him” and (especially) “Spanish Rose” though, the costumes and choreography might take away from the exceptional vocal abilities of this talented actress, leaving her breathless, at points. Overall, DiSabatino gives a praise-worthy and thoroughly entertaining performance.

Seth David as Albert Peterson. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Last but not least, Seth David as Albert Peterson, who is a standout in this piece. Though he may not look like the clean-cut, suit and tie gentleman of the mid-century business man with his modern looking long hair pulled back into a pony tail, he still embodies all the qualities and insecurities of this character. He works well with both Melissa Broy Forston as his overbearing mother and Alana DiSabatino as his pushy, but patient girlfriend, balancing his characters interaction between the both of them. His transition is seamless from a dedicated, allegiant son to a confident, independent man is believable and he manages to keep the character likable throughout. Vocally, David is a powerhouse and performs his numbers such as “Put On a Happy Face” and “Talk to Me” near perfectly with an impressive grasp of the choreography given to him making for a superb performance.

Seth David and Alana DiSabatino. Artistic Synergy of Baltimore

Final thought…Bye Bye Birdie is a fun, lighthearted piece that’s perfect for community and small theatres and Artistic Synergy of Baltimore gets it right with this production. They have a very dedicated and talented cast and crew and the production is well-thought out with a good pacing. Aside from the canned music, the cast handles the material well and they make this classic, often-produced piece their own making for an enjoyable evening of theatre.

This is what I thought of Artistic Synergy of Baltimore’s production of Bye Bye Birdie… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Bye Bye Birdie will play through March 19 at Artistic Synergy of Baltimore, Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 8212 Philadelphia Road. For tickets, call the box office at (410) 288-4281 or purchase them online.

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