Review: Madagascar, A Musical Adventure at Red Branch Theatre Company

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

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NOTE: MADAGASCAR, A MUSICAL ADVENTURE CLOSED DECEMBER 23, 2017

Running Time: Approx. 80 minutes with one 15-minute intermission

Do you like to move it, move it? Well, if you do, you’re probably familiar with the 2005 Dreamworks film Madagascar. If you’re not familiar with it and it’s sequels, it’s a cute computer-animated feature about four unlikely animal friends, a lion, a zebra, a giraffe, and a hippo, from the Central Park Zoo who find themselves on the island of Madagascar, realizing what it is to be in the wild. Red Branch Theatre Company’s latest offering, Madagascar, A Musical Adventure, with a Book by Kevin Del Aguila and Music and Lyrics by George Noriega and Jose Someillan, is the stage version of this popular film, Directed by Jenny Male, with Music Direction by Dustin Merril, and Choreography by Angeleaza Anderson, Sarah Luckadoo, and Jenny Male, is fun, energetic production perfect for this time of year when you need a break from the crazy mid-Atlantic weather and the hustle and bustle of the holidays.

Set Design by Jacob Cordell is minimal but appropriate and sets the scenes cleverly. Using set pieces, it’s easy to determine where each scene is placed and Cordell decorates the set festively that works quite will with this piece.

A highlight of this production is Choreography by Angeleaza Anderson, Sarah Luckadoo, and Jenny Male. It’s contemporary, high energy, tight, and the ensemble performs it well, adding great value to the production as a whole and keeps the attention of the targeted, younger audience members.

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The company of Madagascar, A Musical Adventure. Photo: Bruce F Press Photography

Costume Design by Jackie Rebok is well thought-out, flashy, and fanciful, as it should be. With the risk of doing too much for a character when it comes to people playing animals, Rebok’s design is intelligent in that it doesn’t inhibit the actors performances but gives the audience just enough to know which animal is being portrayed. Simple, but spot on, each costume is quite appropriate and adds great value to this production. On a personal note, I think the platform boots for Melman the Giraffe are everything and a clever touch to the character.

Music Diretion by Dustin Merrill is focused and commendable and, even though the production uses recorded music (I’m assuming, since there wasn’t a pit orchestra listed in the program), his cast his well-rehearsed and committed. The score is very pop-inspired and quite catchy. The tunes are hummable and the ensemble has a good grasp of the music making for a delightful production.

Jenny Male takes the helm of this production of Madagascar, A Musical Adventure and her vision and staging of this piece is superb. She doesn’t treat this material simply as a “kids show” but as a quality production. It’s a fluffy show that’s meant to be more fun than anything, but it does have a message of belonging of which Male has a strong comprehension and her vision is clear. Her casting is spot on and her staging keeps the piece moving along nicely with smooth transitions and a peppy pace.

Speaking on the performances of this piece, it’s worth noting that every single ensemble member is 100% committed and gives dedicated, strong performances. They all work well together and take the piece seriously enough to get the message across but also have fun with the material making for an engaging evening of theatre.

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The company of Madagascar, A Musical Adventure. Photo: Bruce F Press Photography

To begin, Rick Westerkamp takes on the role of the over-the-top, zany King Julien and Megan Henderson takes on the character of the business-like assistant, Maurice. Overall, these two give confident performances and are comfortable in their roles, but Westerkamp takes the over-the-top a little too far and it actually hinders his performance. It’s as if he’s trying too hard for the laugh and the portrayal falls a bit flat. Vocally, he’s not the strongest and with one of the most recognizable, catchy songs in the entire production, “I Like to Move It,” one would think this number would be the most memorable. The choreography is spot on but Westerkamp seems to be just going through the motions, depending on the assumption that the audience will find it humorous.

Ben Ribler tackles the role of Alex the Lion, the star of the Central Park Zoo and a carefree, kept creature that takes advantages of all the privileges that entails. Ribler’s character work is admirable and, vocally, he makes a very good showing but it is a subdued performance, lacking energy at times, and he seems to be so soft spoken, it was difficult to make out his dialogue through much of the performance. However, aside from a few minor issues, he has a good presence, understands his character, and seems to be enjoying the role which transfers to the beguiled audience.

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Bryan Thompson as Marty. Photo: Bruce F Press Photography

Performing the role of Marty the Zebra is Bryan Thompson and he has a great grasp of this character and his need for freedom. Thompson’s delivery is commendable and his dedication is apparent for this role. Vocally, he may not be as strong as others in the ensemble, but he holds his own nicely and has great chemistry with his cast mates. Overall, it’s a notable performance and his enjoyment of playing this role shines through.

Though supporting characters, The Penguins are probably some of the most popular characters in this piece and Liliana Evans as Skipper, Angeleaza Anderson as Private, Sarah Luckadoo Rico, and Molly Mayne as Kowalski give a hilarious showing as these determined arctic fowls. They have a brilliant chemistry and work well together. Each actor portrays the individuality of each character and give the Penguins a near perfect balance of hard-nosed, military purpose and compassion for their fellow animals. Kudos to Evans, Anderson, Luckadoo, and Mayne on their wonderful performances.

Danny Bertaux is a highlight in this production as Melman the Giraffe. Melman is such a quirky character, but Bertaux pulls off a stellar performance. He embodies this character who suffers from severe hypochondria and endears himself to the audience. He works quite well with and off of his cast mates and adds a certain charm to this character. It’s worth mentioning, also, that he keeps up with the intense choreography in exceedingly high platform boots (that I absolutely adore) without missing a step. Overall, a praise-worthy performance.

In this particular production, Taylor Washington as Gloria the Hippo as the standout. This lady has a voice on her that soars throughout the theatre and makes one take notice. She’s committed to her role and adds a maternal aspect that is required of Gloria. Her chemistry with her “boys” is spot on and she takes the material seriously enough to tell the story but also has fun with the role that balances out to be a superb performancce.

Final thought… Madagascar is a cute, fun, and energetic staged version of the popular 2005 film and it transfers nicely to the stage. The music is pop-inspired and damned catchy, that you may find yourself humming on your way out of the theatre. The performances are committed and the ensemble is strong. You don’t have to be familiar with the film to enjoy this family-friendly, fluffy, and thoroughly entertaining piece of theatre.

This is what I thought of Red Branch Theatre Company’s production of Madagascar… What did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Madagascar, A Musical Adventure played December 8-23 at Red Branch Theatre Company, 9130-I Red Branch Road, Columbia, MD.

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Review: Harry Connick Jr.’s The Happy Elf at Red Branch Theatre Company

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

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Running Time: 90 minutes with one 10-minute intermission

Tis the season for joy and merry making and the latest offering from Red Branch Theatre Company, Harry Connick Jr.’s The Happy Elf with Music & Lyrics by Harry Connick, Jr. and Book by Lauren Gunderson & Andrew Fishman, with Direction by Laura Greffen, Music Direction by Dustin Merrell, Choreography by Rick Westerkamp, Scenic Design by Gary Grabau, Costume Design by Andrew Malone, and Lighting Design by Stephanie Lynn Williams and Amy Williamson has all this and more. Grab the kids, nieces, nephews, or any young person in your life and check out this fun story of never giving up and discovering one of the true meanings of Christmas.

The cast of Harry Connick Jr.'s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

The cast of Harry Connick Jr.’s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Scenic Design by Gary Grabau is simple yet innovative for this production and the clever use of levels keeps the set interesting as well as the use of revolving flats to create the various settings and getting the cast on and off quickly and quietly. The painted scenes of the North Pole with snow covered hillsides and Evergreen trees are cute and serve their purpose but might be a little plain for such a fun show. However, overall, the scenic design is bright and very fitting for this piece. It’s worth mentioning the inventive, working conveyer belts in Santa’s workshop add great value to this production making for a well-thought out set.

To set the mood, Lighting Design by Stephanie Lynn Williams and Amy Williamson use the lighting wisely to show contrast between the bright and busy North Pole to the downtrodden and dark Bluesville. Lighting is appropriate and does not take away from the production but blends in making for smooth transitions and gives the correct cues to what feeling each scene has.

The cast of Harry Connick, Jr.'s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

The cast of Harry Connick, Jr.’s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Veteran Costume Designer Andrew Malone never disappoints and this production is no different. Malone hits the nail on the head with this fanciful wardrobe for elves and dear old Santa Clause and citizens of Bluesville alike. Each elf costume is individual and adds to the characters and all the costumes are traditional, yet they all have a contemporary flair and Mr. Malone is to commended for his work on this production.

The cast of Harry Connick, Jr.'s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

The cast of Harry Connick, Jr.’s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

As this is a show with music by the incomparable Harry Connick, Jr., it goes without saying there is a lot of music and it is, after all, a musical. So, with lots of music comes lots of dancing and Choreographer Rick Westerkamp has taken on this challenge with ease and has this ensemble dancing and gliding across the stage in each number accompanied by this fun and jazzy score. The choreography is well thought-out and is a great match for Connicks music.

Speaking of Connick’s music, Music Direction by Dustin Merrell is superb. Though there is no live orchestra, the consolation prize is hearing the smooth, jazzy recorded voice of Harry Connick, Jr. himself tell the story of The Happy Elf in between the scenes. Merrell has a strong vocal ensemble and has them sounding fantastic in each number. These aren’t the old fashioned Christmas Pageant songs you’ll hear throughout the season, but new jazzy holiday show tunes and Merrell has the cast singing in harmony that rings throughout the theatre.

The Cast of Harry Connick, Jr.'s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

The Cast of Harry Connick, Jr.’s The Happy Elf. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Harry Connick, Jr.’s The Happy Elf is certainly a children’s show, meaning it is a show for children and directing this type of show can be tricky. However, Director Laura Greffen has taken on this challenge and has produced an unqualified success. Her vision is apparent and she understands the humor geared for a young audience, but also understands that parents and adults may be in the audience, as well, and she finds a happy medium to entertain everyone. She keeps the action moving and precise to stay within the 90 minutes, including the intermission and that’s perfect for any children’s show. Overall, Greffen gives us a well put-together and smooth running production.

Moving into the performance aspect of this production, Todd Hochkoppel takes on the role of Mayor and though his is confident and comfortable in this role, his performance fell a little flat for me. However, that’s not to say he didn’t do a good job, because he certainly, like all of the ensemble, gave 100% to his character and understood what his character was about making for a good performance in general.

Adeline K. Sutter takes on the role of an unconventional, modern, slinkier Mrs. Clause that we’re used to, but she pulls it off nicely. Likened more to an old time gangster moll, her acting chops weren’t stretched completely as her only expression was one of irritation and contempt, but she pulled them off very nicely. Sutter takes on double duty and portrays Coppa, an agent in “Gnomeland Security” and a nemesis of our hero, Eubie the Elf. Her talents are much better portrayed in this role and her performance is strong and entertaining.

Santa, the big man himself, is played masterfully by Dean Allen Davis and I’ve got to say, he’s a pretty spot on Santa Clause with a big, resonating speaking voice that booms throughout the theatre. However, his singing voice isn’t as strong, but he still makes a good showing as the joyful old man that has a tummy like a bowlful of jelly.

Dean Allen Davis, Adeline K. Sutter, and Seth Fallon. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Dean Allen Davis, Adeline K. Sutter, and Seth Fallon. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Seth Fallon takes on the role of Norbert, the curmudgeon head honcho Elf in the North Pole who isn’t a big fan of our hero and is by the book and waiting for our hero to falter. Fallon does a fantastic job as the stuffy, sour elf trying to ruin everything the hero is trying to accomplish and he makes the role his own. As good a job he does with the character, he does carry around an “assistant” that is a hand puppet and I’m still scratching my head as to the purpose of said puppet other than children always appreciate a funny looking puppet because it did not seem to move the story forward or have any importance at all. Regardless, Fallong gives a strong, confident performance.

Katie Ganem. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Katie Ganem. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Molly and Curtis, the bad kids from Bluesville are played by Katie Ganem and Sarah Luckadoo, respectively. These two characters, mainly Molly, are the two kids Eubie the Elf is supposed to help see the light and the true meaning of Christmas. Both Ganen and Luckadoo do outstanding jobs portraying bratty kids running amuck in the town, causing trouble and not caring much about anything and Ganen as Molly, gets the point across that she is a neglected child, probably just acting out to get attention. Luckadoo is perfect as the “sidekick” and willing participant in the brattiness going on. The two actors have a great chemistry with each other and the rest of the cast making for wonderful performances.

Megan Henderson takes on the role of Gilda, the sweet, shy elf who has a thing for our hero, Eubie, and Courtney Branch tackles the role of Hamm, the mechanic elf, who spends more time under a sleigh than inside of it. Both of these actresses were confident and comfortable in their respective roles and gave strong performances. Megan Anderson gives off an air of feminine cuteness that the character requires while she tries to get the attentions of Eubie and, most of the time failing, but for no fault of her own. On the other end of the spectrum, Courtney Branch, as Hamm, is very likeable and believable as the more tom-boyish character that just wants to help her friends. Both actors seem to understand the individuality of their characters and plays them accordingly making them a joy to watch.

Cheryl Campo. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Cheryl Campo. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

A definite highlight of this production is Cheryl Campo who plays Gurt, the wife of the Mayor of Bluesville. Aside from being very expressive and totally giving 100% to her role, this lady has a set of pipes on her! Though her solo number is a bit short, it’s easy to hear the strong vocals and they certainly shine through in the ensemble numbers, as well. Campo commands the stage quite well and is an absolute joy to watch. I look forward to seeing more from her in the future.

Justin Moe. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Justin Moe. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Finally, we get to our hero, Eubie the Happy Elf, played skillfully by Justin Moe. Simply going on looks, I couldn’t imagine anyone else playing this role other than Justin Moe but, look aside, he had me sold from the start. He was able to keep the energy up the entire 90 minutes and is absolutely believable as this character, giving his all and taking the role seriously enough to bring the audience into the story. He obviously understands his character’s objective and each choice he makes moves his character toward that goal of making sure Christmas is enjoyed by everyone, even a dark, salty town like Bluesville. Moe is a pleasure to watch with his strong vocal performance, and assured performance that makes him a distinct standout in this production.

Final though… Harry Connick Jr.’s The Happy Elf at Red Branch Theatre Company is a fun, feel-good holiday story that is a good break from the hustle and bustle of this season and it’s perfect for the family as a whole. The kids will adore it and the story is endearing for adults as well, reminding us what Christmas is all about. Take a break from the aforementioned hustle and bustle and take a trip down to Red Branch Theatre Company to join in on their merry making!

That’s what I thought about Harry Connick Jr.’s The Happy Elf, playing at Red Branch Theatre Company… what did you think? Please feel free to leave a comment!

Harry Connick Jr.’s The Happy Elf will play through December 18 at Red Branch Theatre Company, 9130-I Red Branch Road, Columbia, MD. For tickets, call the box office at (410) 220-6517 or purchase them online.

Review: Evil Dead the Musical at Red Branch Theatre Company

By Jason Crawford Samios-Uy

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Running Time: 1 hour and 45 minutes with one 15-minute intermission.

October is upon us and many of us are settling in for a month of scary movie nights, road trips to haunted attractions, decking our homes out with fake spider webs and carved pumpkins, and everything else that is Halloween. Autumn is my absolute favorite time of year and part of this affinity has to do with this frightening holiday! Red Branch Theatre Company‘s latest gory offering, Evil Dead the Musical, Directed and Choreographed by Jenny Male with Music Direction by Aaron Broderick is just what is needed to get the October festivities started and just hits the spooky spot!

Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

If you haven’t at least heard of the 1981 cult hit film Evil Dead and its subsequent sequels and reboots, you had to have been living under a rock for the last 35 years, but, seriously… its a campy horror classic that you should have on your list of films to see before you die. It’s so popular, premium cable network STARZ premiered a new TV show called Ash vs. Evil Dead, based on the film. Both this TV show and the original film star Bruce Campbell as Ash, the unlikely hero, who fights “deadites” to save the world , whether he likes it or not.

Red Branch Theatre Company brings this cult classic to the stage brilliantly and this is an experience you don’t want to miss!

Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Special Effects and Make up really drive this type of show and Hannah Fogler knocked it out of the park with her ingenuity and creativity. At its core, Evil Dead the Musical is a gory, blood-soaked supernatural tale and Fogler completely embraces this. There’s only so much blood and gore one can produce on the stage for a live performance (unless you’re a certain barber on Fleet Street), but Fogler manages to give us just the right amount without making it look too fake or hokey but enough to add value to the production and not take away from the other elements of the production. Zombies are all the rage these days and, if you are unfamiliar with Evil Dead, “deadites” are pretty much zombies and Fogler’s Make-Up Design clinches the look impeccably. With the help of masks, the transitions of the actors is flawless and the Special Effects and Makeup are certainly technical highlights of this production. You’ve been warned! If you’re squeamish, be prepared for the squirting blood and guts that accompany this brilliant piece.

Danny Bertaux as Scott, Sarah Goldstein as Cheryl, and Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Danny Bertaux as Scott, Sarah Goldstein as Cheryl, and Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Set Design by Ryan Haase is nothing short of superb, using levels, the appropriate cool, earthy, woodsy colors of an old, semi-abandoned cabin in the woods, easy entrances and exits to move the action along smoothly, and movable wall art (Yep! You read that correctly!). The space at Red Branch Theatre Company is already a great space for the productions they offer, but Haase has managed to completely turn this stage into the cabin where this crazy story takes place. His eye for detail is extraordinary and he utilizes his space wisely to match the challenges of the setting of this production. Kudos to Haase for his creative eye and smart set design.

Lighting Design by Lynn Joslin effectively captures the creepiness of the setting and set the mood with the dim lighting and use of strobe effects during certain points in the piece giving us a dark wood on a stormy night. Joslin’s design was very appropriate and provided added value to this production.

Angeleaza Anderson as Shelly, Benjamin Stoll as Ash, Sarah Goldstein as Cheryl, Danny Bertaux as Scott, and Carson Gregory as Linda. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Angeleaza Anderson as Shelly, Benjamin Stoll as Ash, Sarah Goldstein as Cheryl, Danny Bertaux as Scott, and Carson Gregory as Linda. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Costume Designer Andrew Malone did a very good job dressing his actors in costumes that are modern but have a nostalgic flair that’s absolutely fitting for this piece. The actors look very comfortable in their respective costumes and move about effortlessly. Notably, the character of Ash had an ensemble that near perfectly matched Bruce Campbell’s attire in the film and Malone is to be commended for his eye for detail.

Jenny Male tackles the double duty of Director and Choreographer and she does a phenomenal job. She takes this familiar, campy tale and transfers it to the stage flawlessly. She keeps the story moving and seems to understand the type of dark humor overflowing in this piece but keeps it together with clever blocking and a spot on casting. It’s challenging to take a piece of popular culture and present it in a new way but Male changes aspects of the story that have to be changed to update and/or fit the stage and keeps beloved aspects of the story intact for the die-hard fans of the original films. The balance is superb and make for a very successful production.

Cast of Evil Dead the Musical. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Cast of Evil Dead the Musical. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

The choreography is just about as campy as the show itself but it works perfectly! The cast seems to have a great time with the dance numbers and I had a great time watching them. They’re upbeat and energized, and just a bit chintzy when they need to be! Kudos to Jenny Male for a job well done.

Under the Music Direction of Aaron Broderick, this ensemble sounds amazing. The score is very good, but campy, but Broderick had this cast in harmony and on point with this piece. The style is modern but still very musical theatre and, as with choreography, the cast seems to have a blast while performing these songs and with songs with titles such as “What the Fuck Was That?” and “Do the Necronomicon”… how could one not have a great time?

Front (l-r) Carson Gregory as Linda, Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Back (l-r) Danny Bertaux as Scott, Angeleaza Anderson as Shelly, Sarah Goldstein as Cheryl. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Front (l-r) Carson Gregory as Linda, Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Back (l-r) Danny Bertaux as Scott, Angeleaza Anderson as Shelly, Sarah Goldstein as Cheryl. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Though there is what many would consider a main character (Ash), this is truly an ensemble piece and this entire ensemble has great chemistry and they all work well together. It’s a joy to watch them interact, play off of, and support each other, just as a tight-knit cast should.

Peter Boyer, Cole Watts, and Sarah Luckadoo bring up the “chorus” or ensemble of this cast, but that certainly doesn’t mean they aren’t essential to this piece.

Peter Boyer takes on the role of Jake and, though his character seemed a little out of place as a reliable hillbilly who happens to be wandering in the same woods as the abandoned cabin, he played the role well, giving 100% and his comedic timing was spot on. His number “Good Old Reliable Jake” seemed to be filler, to me, but he performed the number admirably.

Sarah Luckadoo and Peter Doyle. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Sarah Luckadoo and Peter Doyle. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Cole Watts portrays Ed, the submissive boyfriend of a much more assertive character who falls into an unfortunate situation, and though Watts doesn’t have a ton of stage time, his number “Bit Part Demon,” which pokes fun at the obligatory slaying of various demons in Evil Dead, is impressive and he keeps the energy up throughout the number.

Sarah Luckadoo rounds out the ensemble of this production and does a fine job as both living characters and inanimate objects such as a footbridge and she does it all with gusto and high energy. She manages to have fun with the camp and creates a very enjoyable performance.

Danny Bertaux as Scott and Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Danny Bertaux as Scott and Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

The five unfortunate friends who find themselves in the middle of this bloody, demonic story are Shelly, the ditzy, “loose woman,” played by Angeleaza Anderson (who plays a completely different, scholarly character named Annie, as well), Scotty, the bone-head best friend played by Danny Bertaux, Cheryl, this good girl, nerdy sister played by Sarah Goldstein, Linda, the hero’s girl, played by Carson Gregory, and our unlikely dashing hero, played by Benjamin Stoll.

Danny Bertaux, as Scotty, has a great command of the stage and is very comfortable in his role as the stereotypical “frat boy” looking for a good time in the woods with a girl he picked up only days before. Vocally, he does an impeccable job carrying the lower range and keeping in harmony with his fellow singers and he fills out the ensemble numbers very nicely. His character portrayal could have been reigned in a bit as, at times, it seems he’s trying too hard and going over the top, even for a campy piece. Overall, his performance is admirable and he’s giving his all which is fun to watch.

Benjamin Stoll as Ash, Angeleaza Anderson as Annie, Peter Doyle as Jake. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Benjamin Stoll as Ash, Angeleaza Anderson as Annie, Peter Doyle as Jake. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Angeleaza Anderson does a great job playing Shelly, the absolutely annoying counterpart to Danny Bertaux’s Scotty. She does such a good job, I found myself really irate with this person, waiting for her demise. Her performance of this character could have been pulled back a bit, as well, as it was a bit much, at times. Thankfully, Anderson picks up the role of Annie, the scientist and very intelligent daughter of the owner of the cabin, who comes to searching for her father. This character was much more likable, though matter-of-face, but her transition between the two characters was a complete switch displaying Anderson’s impressive acting chops. Her vocal performance was equally impressive, carrying the higher register and her number “All the Men in My Life Keep Getting Killed by Candarian Demons” is entertaining and very enjoyable.

Danny Bertaux, Carson Gregory, and Peter Doyle. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Danny Bertaux, Carson Gregory, and Peter Doyle. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

As Linda, the hero’s girlfriend and loyal S-Mart employee, Carson Gregory takes on this role with the understanding that the character is not the dramatic, romantic lead and it works brilliantly! She’s comfortable on the stage and gives a strong performance. Her vocal abilities are apparent as she flawlessly sings through the heartwarming and humorous “Housewares Employee” that deals with the meeting and eventual relationship between Linda and Ash. Gregory is a confident and diligent performer that is an asset to this production.

One of the highlights of this production of Evil Dead the Musical is Sarah Goldstein who takes on the role of Cheryl, the good-girl of the group. Goldstein really embraces this character and gives her all to her performance. Her comedic timing is spot on and she plays her character straight, making the craziness of the situation even more humorous. She’s a very strong performer and is quite comfortable on the stage and in this role. Her numbers “They Won’t Let Us Leave” and “Look Who’s Evil Now” are fun to watch and she pulls them off confidently as these songs sit well in her vocal range. She’s another actor who takes on two different characters and the transition is superb. As one of the characters with a good amount of stage time, she doesn’t drop her character once, keeping it up throughout the entire piece. She’s definitely one to watch in this production.

Angeleaza Anderson as Annie and Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

Angeleaza Anderson as Annie and Benjamin Stoll as Ash. Credit: Bruce F Press Photography

This brings us to our handsome, humorous hero, Ash, played flawlessly by Benjamin Stoll. Stoll carries this production effortlessly and seems to understand the humor and tongue and cheek that accompanies this piece. His comedic timing is near perfect and his physical work is outstanding. Vocally, Stoll is a standout with a smooth, beautiful baritone-tenor that resonates through the theatre. It doesn’t hurt that he’s pretty easy on the eyes being cute as a button and dashing all at the same time! However, school girl crush aside, Stoll does an amazing job in this role. This character is so iconic, it’s quite challenging to take on the responsibility of keeping the character familiar but also bringing a fresh point of view. Stoll very impressively manages to make the character of Ash his own and not a second rate version of the genius of Bruce Campbell and it made his performance top notch. I’m looking forward to seeing Stoll’s work in the future.

Final thought… Evil Dead the Musical is a fun, bloody, and definitely campy show that certainly doesn’t take itself too seriously and it’s easy to see the performers are having a great time which results in the audience having a great time, as well. You don’t have to be familiar with the films to enjoy the show and if you are not familiar, it’s a great introduction and if you are familiar, this production has taken care not to mess too much with the themes and gags that made the films so successful and you’ll certainly be overcome with a feeling of nostalgia. Perfect for the Halloween season, you should add this show to your Fall “to do” calendar!

This is what I thought of this production of Evil Dead the Musical.… what do you think?

Evil Dead the Musical will play through October 29 at Red Branch Theatre Company, 9130-I Red Branch Road, Columbia MD 21045. For tickets, call the box office at 410-997-9352 or purchase them online.